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Dealing with hair loss is something different people tackle in different ways. For Lauren Marcus, the star of cult Young Adult off-Broadway theatre show, Be More Chill, it involved writing a song.

Be More ChillCalled ‘Funeral’ the song explains her feelings about losing her hair to the autoimmune disorder Alopecia Areata.

She has also spoken openly about the recent and sudden loss of ‘99.7% of the hair on [her] head’ in social media posts and in an article written for Yahoo Lifestyle.

Explaining Alopecia Areata

Lauren Marcus has an acute form of the disorder which has affected the hair follicles on her scalp and parts of her body, resulting in patchy hair loss but without the loss of her eyebrows and eyelashes.

She tries to be positive about managing this new issue and is clear about the importance of talking candidly about Alopecia Areata in order to educate people and raise awareness. This is especially important given the hairloss the condition causes can often, upsettingly, be mistaken for cancer – something people with all forms of autoimmune alopecia frequently point out.

Writing in Yahoo Lifestyle, she says,”A lot of times I’ll be out and if I’m not wearing something around my head, I’ll hear little kids ask their parents, “Why does that girl have no hair?” And they’ll tell their kids to shut up and walk away, and I want to try to explain. Often people assume I have cancer. They’ll come up to me and tell me their stories, and when I say I have alopecia, they’ll say something like “Thank your lucky stars you don’t have cancer!” Of course I’m grateful that I don’t have cancer. But I’m still allowed to be upset that all my hair fell out.” Continues below…

Woof. Okay. So…ready? Here goes. (Please excuse the lack of paragraph breaks here, and head to FB if you need more writing-clarity…don’t have the patience to figure out how to put ’em in here!) I lost all my hair, guys. Like all of it except for a few itty bitty strands that were starting to make me feel like an old man with a bad combover. And then last night around midnight I decided to shave the rest of it off with the help of one of my best friends, who just so happens to be in St. Louis with me (thank god), working on another show while I work on THE HUMANS. (If you’re anything like me, at this point in the post you may have just gone to my FB photos and scrolled through to see if you could detect any signs of hair loss over the last several months or years. If so, I admire your internet sleuthing ways!) The short version of the very, very long story is that I have alopecia. And because I just couldn’t stop there, my body went the rarer route and developed “acute alopecia areata”. This is A BRAND. NEW. LIFE. DEVELOPMENT. It began with a bald spot–I’m not kidding–two days before COMPANY opened in August, and progressed to me losing 99.7% of the hair on my head by yesterday. Most of it left me over Christmas. These have been five of the hardest, scariest, and more bizarre months of my adult life, and I am still figuring it out as I go, you know? AND IT’S STILL HAPPENING! What’s next? Eyebrows? Eyelashes?? Who’s to say?! When I’m back in March, if you have questions, we can talk allllllll about it then. I LOVE to talk about it! And Joe Iconis, the most supportive and loving husband in the goddamn WORLD (and who, ironically, has absolutely said to me in years past–more than once–that he finds bald women very attractive) will probably be beyond excited for me to have someone else to discuss every tiny, alopecia-ridden detail of the whole affair with. [CONT IN COMMENTS]

A post shared by Lauren Marcus (@laurmarcus) on


Will only wear a wig whilst performing

Whether or not to wear a wig can be a bigger decision for people who have lost their hair – for whatever reason – than some may appreciate. For Marcus she says that, as her Be More Chill character – Brooke – has long blonde hair, as she used to, she will wear a wig on stage to continue to play the role. The feeling of having no hair of her own to flip, as required in the script, initially provided a painful reminder of what she was missing for the musical theatre actress, she admitted.

Off stage Lauren Marcus wears hats and scarves to cover her head, as well as rocking her natural bald look. She will not, however, wear a wig in her private, everyday life citing feeling uncomfortable about people who remember what she looked like with hair seeing her in a wig as the reason she isn’t considering this option for now.

Although she she is clear that she didn’t exactly sign up to be an Alopecia Areata spokesperson, she says being able to make an impact and help fans who reach out to her about their hair loss, does make her happy. “Even a few months ago I was frantically Googling, looking for somebody, some other actor, who’d had this and was open about it so I wouldn’t feel so alone,” states Marcus.

She now joins a list of hugely successful, inspirational actors and athletes who are also keen to help others dealing with alopecia. This includes comedy actor Matt Lucas, action movie and Dumbo star Joseph Gatt, Gotham and Barry henchman Anthony Carrigan and gold medal-winning Olympic cyclist Joanna Rowsell-Shand.

Whilst Alopecia Areata treatment is possible for the scalp-only form for medically-suitable over 16s, most of these celebrities have the most severe form, Alopecia Universalis, which cannot yet be effectively treated, though many proposed treatments are in development.


Circ - Minoxidil iconThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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A team of researchers from different departments across The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, have investigated cancer risks associated with the various phenotypes of Alopecia Areata.

This autoimmune disorder can affect different hair-bearing areas of the head and body, depending on the severity of the form. For instance, the mildest form – also known as Alopecia Areata (AA) – causes patchy hair loss of the scalp only, whilst Alopecia Totalis(AT)leads to total baldness of the scalp, often accompanied by the loss of facial hair, eyelashes and eyebrows, whilst the most extreme variation, Alopecia Universalis (AU) causes a person to become completely hairless from head to toe.

Other types of autoimmune alopecia can affect the beard area or the entire circumference of the hairline, however it was only the three key phenotypes outlined above which were considered in this June 2018 study.

Diagram Belgravia Centre Different Types of Alopecia Areata autoimmune hair loss

Areas affected by hair loss shown in blue

Increased risk of certain cancers

National statistical data was used to study the risk of cancers in people with Alopecia Areata, Totalis and Universalis, with the aim of establishing whether each individual phenotype of alopecia carried the same associations.

Researchers enrolled 668,604 patients who had been treated within the January 2007 to December 2014 period for one of these hair loss conditions. The participants were then separated into two groups by condition – AA or AT/AU – then by age and sex, and paired with a matched control volunteer without any form of AA in order to draw comparison data.

Risks were measured using hazard ratios (HR) – in this instance, the measure of how likely people with the various forms of alopecia were to develop cancer over a specific period of time – and confidence intervals (CI) – the defined range of values within which the likely value lies or, essentially, how likely the HR is to be correct.

According to the report’s findings, which were published in the Nature Research journal Science Reports on 27th June 2018 and make for interesting reading, all Alopecia Areata (1.022–1.065 HR), Totalis and Universalis (1.013–1.129 HR) had a slightly higher general risk of developing cancer than control participants. The CIs were reported as being 95 per cent in each case, providing a high level of certainty in the HR data.

No increased risk of developing some cancers, including lung, kidney, breast, pancreas, or skin cancer, lymphoma and leukaemia, was uncovered in any AA, AT or AU patients. However both groups demonstrated an higher propensity towards thyroid cancer, whilst scalp-only AA patients also had increased risks of bladder and prostate cancer.

Other health issues to monitor for

The Korean team concluded that ‘Careful monitoring is needed to explore if the actual risks of thyroid, bladder, and prostate cancers are increased in alopecia patients’.

This research follows other reports which have established links between additional health issues that people with all forms of Alopecia Areata may be more prone to, including other autoimmune disorders, dry eye disease, and mental health issues.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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As any film from The Fast and the Furious franchise proves, there are many men for whom baldness is a great look. But, for others, going bald is not something to embrace as wholeheartedly as Vin Diesel, Tyrese or Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson.

One reason some men can be uncomfortable about losing their hair is due to some of the perceived negative associations that surround hair loss.

In addition to – incorrectly – being considered a sign of ‘old age’, according to a report in the British Journal of Dermatology, baldness is also used in children’s animated films as a ‘visual shorthand for negative traits’. In short, we are taught from a young age that baddies are bald, which is where early negative connotations can start.

On-going reinforcement of negative stereotypes

Child watching TV television film movie cartoon animationPublished in June 2018, the University of Texas study considered the morality and visual dermatological attributes of key human characters from the top 50 highest grossing animated movies up to January 2017. Half of the films reviewed were released after 2010. Films where the characters were animals or robots, or where there was a PG-13 rating, were excluded.

It found that a number of dermatological issues, including baldness, wrinkles, scars, moles and spots, were used to signify how ‘bad’ a character was in 76.5 per cent of the animations studied. Only 25.9 per cent of ‘good’ characters shared any of these traits.

This backs previous findings from a 2017 clinical evaluation of movie villains which also found hair loss to be a top trait, showing how this stereotyped view may start in childhood and be subconsciously reinforced throughout people’s lives.

Destigmatising baldness

This stigmatisation does not just apply to men with Male Pattern Baldness, of course; it also refers to men, women and children with hairloss from the autoimmune disorder Alopecia Areata.

This can cause anything from treatable patchy hair loss anywhere on the scalp, to complete baldness of the head – including facial hair, lashes and eyebrows, to the body rejecting all hair from head to toe in the most extreme form. These latter two conditions, Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis, cannot currently be effectively treated though it is hoped that at least one of the many autoimmune hair loss solutions in development will become available for prescription in around the year 2021.

For people affected by any of these hair loss conditions, combating long-held misconceptions can be an upsetting experience, so the American researchers and the British Association of Dermatologists have called for film-makers to do better.

The depiction of skin issues in movies and its association with evil over good could be a factor contributing to the stigma of skin disease,” commented Michael Ryan, one of the researchers involved in the study. “Societal perceptions and beliefs regarding beauty and youthfulness are likely underlying the desire [for treatments]. The association between evil and skin findings in film could be one factor that contributes to these beliefs.

British Association of Dermatologists’ Communications Officer, Matthew Gass also noted, “The animated films we watch as children tend to stick with us, with many of us being able to fondly recall our favourites with ease. We watch them in formative years when we are learning about good and evil, and whether they mean to or not, it’s likely that they impact our biases and associations. One thing that thing that we know is that the creators of these works are capable of producing emotional, nuanced, and thoughtful works. We hope that this means that they will be open to considering this research when making animated films in future.”


The Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinic - Hair Loss Specialist ConsultationThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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It has long been established that people diagnosed with one autoimmune disorder are more prone to additional autoimmune diseases. However, a link has also been suspected between psychosis and non-neurological autoimmune disorders.

One of the conditions this includes is Alopecia Areata, which can affect men, women and children, and involves the body turning on its own hair follicles. It has various phenotypes which each present in increasing degrees of hair loss, from rounded bald patches on the scalp only, to baldness of the head, or from head to toe.

brain psychology psychosis mental healthAccording to Psychology Today, previous Taiwanese and Danish studies had found schizoprenia to be more common in people with certain non-neurological autoimmune disorders, including Alopecia Areata. With the presence of such an autoimmune disorder estimated to potentially increase the risk of schizoprenia by 30 to 45 per cent.

Now, new data from King’s College London and the National Institute for Health Research in the UK disputes this in relation to autoimmune alopecia.

‘No significant associations’

Meta-analysis research detailing the findings was published in the Biological Psychiatry journal on 28th June 2018. The study involved reviewing data for more than 25 million people taken from 31 studies which were performed prior to or in April 2018.

A positive correlation between non-neurological autoimmune disorders and psychosis was established, but the propensity varied dramatically depending on the disorder. It showed that both conditions could occur simultaneously, as well as finding that psychosis could increase the risk of developing non-neurological autoimmune disorders – or vice versa.

Whilst those showing most consistent links with psychosis were listed as being pernicious anaemia, pemphigoid, psoriasis, coeliac disease and Graves’ disease, the research paper states that ‘no significant associations with psychosis were observed for alopecia areata’.

Study authors speculated that, ‘specific factors, including distinct inflammatory pathways, genetic influences, autoantibodies targeting brain proteins, or exposure to corticosteroid treatment’ may underlie any positive association between non-neurological autoimmune disorders and psychosis. They recommend monitoring at risk patients for early signs of psychosis and psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia.

Mental health and alopecia areata

Due to the sudden onset and highly visible of all forms of Alopecia Areata, it is often associated with mental health struggles, including anxiety and depression. Even England Rugby player Heather Fisher, known for her mental toughness on the pitch, has spoken openly about finding her baldness hard to cope with sometimes.

Whilst Alopecia Areata treatment can be used by over 16s with the scalp-only form, those with the more extreme variations – Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis  – have no safe and effective options as yet.

Though wigs, hats and scarves may provide temporary respite, professional counselling can be useful in helping people to come to terms with losing their hair. By learning strategies and coping mechanisms for dealing with both their own and other people’s reactions to their baldness, people affected by hairloss can often become more confident. Anyone interested in taking this route should speak to reputable specialists to whom they can usually be referred or recommended by their doctor, dermatologist or by charities such as Alopecia UK.


Circ - Minoxidil iconThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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Some promising news has been released regarding the topical hair loss treatment being developed for two currently untreatable autoimmune disorders: Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis.

Late on 9th July 2018, Aclaris Therapeutics, Inc. – the pharmaceutical company behind the drug, known as ATI-502 – announced the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the treatment a Fast Track designation.

This means that the organisation will work with Aclaris, with its clinical trial results and findings in relation to this topical hair loss solution being considered as a priority by the American regulatory body – the US equivalent of the UK’s MHRA. As such, it is likely to proceed as quickly as possible to the approval stage needed to become widely available for prescription use.

food-and-drug-administration-usa-fdaPromising results for ATI-502

Only days ago we reported on the positive outcomes noted in the primary data released from the current Phase 2 clinical trial for ATI-502. It showed that the first six patients using the topical drug had absorbed ATI-502 well with no reported side effects over the initial 28 day period, nor the following six month phase.

Most encouragingly, Aclaris released research notes which stated that the treatment demonstrated an ability to modify the genetic signature of these severe forms of Alopecia Areata. As the precise mechanisms involved in all forms of these autoimmune hairloss conditions is relatively uncertain, this presented a potentially significant breakthrough for both understanding these disorders, as well as learning how to treat them.

Currently there are only Alopecia Areata treatment options with meaningful success rates for the scalp-only form which presents as rounded bald spots or patches. Alopecia Totalis presents as baldness of the entire scalp as well as facial hair loss, including losing eyelashes and eyebrows, whilst Alopecia Universalis causes the entire head and body to become smooth and completely hairless. Whilst some, usually steroid-based, Totalis and Universalis treatments are available, none have significant success rates, making them largely futile.

Second treatment to be FDA Fast-Tracked

With the development of Janus Kinase inhibitors – more commonly referred to as JAK inhibitors – as potential hair loss treatments for autoimmune alopecia, drugs such as ATI-502 have started to bring the dream of a truly effective treatment closer to reality.

This is not the only medication to have been fast-tracked by the FDA for these conditions, either – Concert Pharmaceuticals announced its oral tablet CTP-543 had received this designation in January 2018- doubling the chance of this long-awaited development coming to fruition.

Current estimates suggest that the first JAK inhibitor, or JAK inhibitor-inspired treatments for Alopecia Areata in all its phenotypes, should be ready to release in around three years time, in 2021. This is assuming the remaining phases of each drug’s clinical trials go to plan and meet the necessary criteria regarding safety, efficacy and tolerability, for the relevant FDA approvals and MHRA licences to be granted.


The Belgravia CentreThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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HairlossANSWERS - Click to Submit Your Query to Our Hair Loss Experts

Name: Evelyn

Question: I am nearly 60 years old. I lost all my hair almost 15 years ago but the final straw was the eyelashes and the lack of these is magnified by my spectacles. Every so often I apply false eyelashes but with hot flushes they have come off in embarrassing situations both at work and during family gatherings. My eyes seem to have shrunk in size and often run in all weather conditions. Although I use thick black waterproof eye pencils these come off the minute I get into the pool and I now shun shared public facilities. I have read about eyelash transplants, but I am concerned about the likely risks. I would be grateful for an expert opinion.

false eyelashesAnswers: Hi, Evelyn. Eyelash transplants are a highly specialist area. They involve using scalp follicles to use as the donor hair. Due to your hair loss – which we are assuming is the result of a severe form of Alopecia Areata, namely either Alopecia Totalis or Alopecia Universalis – we are unsure if you would be a suitable candidate. It may be possible to use donor hair follicles from someone else but this is something you would need to discuss with a specialist surgeon.

As head-hair is used to replace eyelash hair, the newly-grafted eyelashes would grow in the same manner as scalp hair. As such, they would need regular trimming, as well as regular curling or perming in order to ensure they look natural.

This is not an area we are particularly familiar with given we specialise in non-surgical hair loss treatment of the scalp only. However, we are aware of one well-respected surgeon in the UK who is involved in this procedure, and was in fact the first in the UK to carry out this type of surgery in 2009. He recently stated at London’s FACE conference, that the procedure tends to take 3-4 hours at a cost of around £4,000. You can find out more on page 134 of the FACE abstracts document.

When investigating any type of hair transplant, but especially one that is such a newly developed procedure, it is incredibly important to find a reputable, highly-skilled surgeon. Not just because you want them to do the best possible, most professional job of carrying out the operation, but also to ensure you get the best pre-op advice as to whether or not you would be suitable and what the possible positives and negatives, including side effects, of having an eyelash transplant could be.

There are JAK inhibitor hairloss treatments for both scalp and eyebrows currently being developed and showing promising results, so we would hope eyelash regrowth will also be positively affected.

These are unlikely to become available until around 2021, but in the meantime it may be worthwhile considering other options such as medical tattooing or permanent makeup, if you are unhappy with the appearance of your eyes. Eyebrows can be microbladed on, which can help to add definition to the eye area, whilst permanent makeup can be used to provide eyeliner which will not sweat off, nor be affected by runny eyes.

Again, it is incredibly important to go to specialists in these fields, they require a high level of training and expertise to ensure a natural-looking finish, so make sure you do your research before going for consultations with a range of different practitioners, and see examples of their previous work, before making a decision if you do decide to investigate.

If you are looking for recommendations in any of these areas, your GP or a hair loss charity, such as Alopecia UK, may be a good place to start.


circ - The Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinic - For Men and WomenThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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A clinical trial, claimed to be ‘the most advanced topical JAK inhbitor trials’ in the USA for Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis – the two most severe phenotypes of Alopecia Areata, has reported positive initial results.

The interim data from this Phase 2, AA-202 Topical trial into an investigational Janus Kinase (JAK) inhibitor known as ATI-502, was announced by the development company Aclaris Therapeutics, on 28th June 2018.

Whilst the study was small – with only 11 participants – the reports so far are certainly encouraging given there are currently no consequential treatment options for these severe forms of autoimmune alopecia.

Positively impacts Alopecia Areata’s ‘genetic signature’

Diagram Belgravia Centre Different Types of Alopecia Areata autoimmune hair loss

Areas of the scalp and body affected by each Alopecia Areata phenotype are shown here in blue

For a 28 day period ATI-502, the investigational topical Janus Kinase (JAK) 1/3 inhibitor or a placebo were given daily to 11 patients with either Alopecia Totalis – which causes baldness of the entire scalp and can also cause facial hairloss, including eyelashes and eyebrows – or Alopecia Universalis – which causes the head and body to become completely hairless. Following this, all patients were given ATI-502 as part of a six-month ‘open label’ period.

The primary aims were to evaluate ATI-502’s pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety. How far into the skin the solution managed to penetrate was measured via punch biopsies taken at baseline and on day 28. This proved to be the same as in previous testing, with a mean absorption average of 5650 nanograms/gram at day 28.

Aclaris released information on the first six patients to be treated as part of this trial via a press release, which confirmed ‘no serious adverse events were reported during the 28-day dosing period’. It was noted that one patient did withdraw during the six-month open label period, however. This was reportedly the result of major depression unrelated to the clinical trial.

From the pharmacodynamic update provided, it appears the research team has made a potentially significant breakthrough regarding the biological processes that cause Alopecia Areata, as well as how to treat these most extreme phenotypes.

Of the six patients’ baseline interferon gamma and cytotoxic T-cell gene expression signatures, two showed high levels of elevation, two showed low levels of elevation and two showed no elevation at all. In each pair, one was treated wit ATI-502 and the other received a placebo. In each instance, there was a positive change in both biomarkers for the patient from each pair that was treated with the active drug.

Potential breakthrough

According to Aclaris Therapeutics, Inc., ‘This data is the first indication that ATI-502 is absorbed through human skin in the clinical setting and engages the target. The results also demonstrate the pharmacodynamic effect of modulating the appropriate genes associated with the interferon gamma pathway and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, which are 2 of 3 biomarker components of the Alopecia Areata Disease Activity Index (ALADIN) score.

Our hypothesis is this response can be predicted by a patient’s baseline genetic signature.’

Whilst there is still further testing to be done, and more clinical investigations are necessary, particularly on a wider scale, this does show that JAK inhibitor treatment for Alopecia Totalis and Universalis is definitely moving in the right direction.

Should all trials go to plan and the necessary medical regulatory licences and approvals, such as those from the UK’s MHRA and the FDA in America, it is estimated that these types of treatments should be ready for prescription around 2021. This would mean that people with these more severe variations could also have Alopecia Areata treatment options, as adults with the scalp-only form currently do.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Treatment Before and After Results - New Success Story

alert alopecia areata the belgravia centre 29 06 2018

A new entry has just been added to Belgravia’s Alopecia Areata Treatment Success Stories gallery.

Ms J, pictured, is pleased to have seen dense regrowth since she started treating her patchy hair loss at Belgravia.

Read her Belgravia Centre review and see her regrowth results close up, or find out more about treating patchy hair loss from Alopecia Areata by clicking the relevant button below…

(Results may vary and are not guaranteed)

 

VIEW SUCCESS STORY

TreatmenT information 

 


The Belgravia Centre Hair Loss ClinicThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


Two of the most frequently asked questions Belgravia hair specialists have been receiving in recent years are ‘when will there be a treatment for Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis?’ and ‘when will JAK inhibitor Alopecia treatments be released?’.

The reason for this is that, whilst Alopecia Areata treatment is possible in cases of the scalp-only form of this autoimmune disorder, there are currently no truly effective hair loss solutions for the more severe forms of Alopecia Areata – namely, Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis. These cause total baldness of the head, in the case of Totalis, whilst people with Alopecia Universalis have no hair at all anywhere on their scalp, face or body.

JAK inhibitors, or Janus kinase inhibitors to give them their full name, are a suite of drugs which were discovered to have hair growth properties after the drug tofacitinib was used experimentally to treat a patient with plaque psoriasis. The young man also happened to have Alopecia Universalis – both being autoimmune conditions – and had not grown any hair in around 20 years. Following just X weeks of treatment, whilst there were some improvements to his psoriasis, he had regrown a full head of hair.

Diagram Belgravia Centre Different Types of Alopecia Areata autoimmune hair lossSince then tofacitinib and other JAK inhibitor drugs have been in clinical development as researchers try to find the safest, most effective doses and solutions in order to minimise potential side effects whilst maximising hair regrowth potential for all forms of autoimmune alopecia.

Updates on trials and findings have been uncharacteristically forthcoming, not to mention regular, from companies at the forefront of these investigations, namely Aclaris Therapeutics Inc, and Concert Pharmaceuticals.

Oral JAK inhibitor medicine

The latest news on JAK inhibitor treatments comes from Aclaris; on 27th June 2018, the company announced that the first patient taking part in its Phase 2 ATI-501 Oral Suspension treatment trial had started treatment. Other participants are still being recruited, however, all 80 volunteers taking part in the randomised, multi-centre trial (reference: AUAT-201) will have diagnoses of stable Alopecia Totalis or Alopecia Universalis.

They will be treated for six months, receiving either the ATI-50 solution or a placebo for the duration. Results will be measured at Week 24, with the primary goal being to establish increased mean changes in hair growth for each patient, using the Severity of Alopecia Tool (SALT). Other factors, including changes to hair density measured via the Alopecia Density and Extent Score (ALODEX) and observations from both clinicians and patients, will also contribute to the study’s overall findings.

This information appears to bust the original assumptions that the oral treatment being developed would be in tablet form. An ‘oral suspension’ generally relates to liquid medication containing small particles of a drug which does not dissolve.

“This trial is the first step in evaluating the potential clinical benefit of ATI-501 oral suspension in treating patients with the alopecia totalis and alopecia universalis forms of alopecia areata,” said Dr. Stuart Shanler, Chief Scientific Officer of Aclaris. “This is an important step forward in understanding the clinical utility of our JAK inhibitors in patients with AA.”

Topical solution also in development

Columbia University‘s medical department has been making the key discoveries and granting its patents to these treatments exclusively to Aclaris, which has helped it to build a portfolio of JAK inhibitor drugs. At least one of these is known to be a topical JAK inhibitor treatment, with an estimated release date for both drug formats currently being set at 2021.

This timeline is based on all necessary clinical trial stages going smoothly, to time, and being successfully completed in order to obtain the crucial medical regulatory board licenses and approvals, such as those from the UK’s MHRA and the FDA in the USA.

Other drug companies including Pfizer and Concert Pharmaceuticals are also developing potential Alopecia Totalis and Universalis treatments. The FDA has even fast-tracked Concert’s proposed treatment’s trials, in recognition of the need to address this unmet need for affected patients. However, updates have been less forthcoming from these companies so far, with both currently being actively engaged in clinical trials.


The Belgravia CentreThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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As society leans in to the fact that ‘representation matters’, people with the autoimmune disorder Alopecia Areata have a huge opportunity to raise awareness of this hair loss condition, coming in March 2019.

Inspirational Maltese actor Joseph Gatt, who has Alopecia Universalis, will star alongside the likes of Colin Farrell, Danny DeVito and Eva Green in the live-action remake of Disney’s Dumbo by Tim Burton. The hotly anticipated film is expected to be a worldwide big screen blockbuster with Gatt playing a new character named Neils Skellig.

The powerful significance of many children – and adults – having the chance to see someone with the same struggles as them feature in a big movie, where their Alopecia is not a factor in the storyline, should not be underestimated.

Alopecia role models

Thor actor Gatt is an active, high profile supporter of Alopecia Areata charities and always quick to help share his own experiences and struggles with the most severe form of autoimmune alopecia.

Whilst more celebrities appear to be opening up about their own experiences with Alopecia Areata, which causes patchy hair loss to the scalp-only, or Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis (baldness of the head and from head to toe, respectively), given the condition affects roughly 2-3 per cent of the population, there are still relatively few role models out there. Continues below…


Among those showing people with autoimmune hair loss that it is possible to succeed regardless of their condition, include former Olympian Joanna Rowsell Shand, comedian, basketball player Charlie Villanueva and actor Matt Lucas – who has also appeared in Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland remake, as well as its follow-up, Alice Through the Looking Glass.

Gatt’s friend, the Gotham and Barry star, Anthony Carrigan is another alopecian who speaks regularly and confidently about his hairloss issues. Carrigan developed Alopecia Universalis part way through a series he was filming and often talks about the impact it had on his life, emotionally as well as on his career, and how he deals with it.

Like Gatt, Villanueva, Lucas, and Rowsell-Shand, he has definitely not let this highly visible condition hold him back, and has used his fame to help empower others living with Alopecia Areata in all its forms.

Whilst Alopecia Areata treatment can be possible for those aged 16 years and over, this applies solely to the scalp-only form. Currently there is no proven, safe and effective treatment for Alopecia Totalis or Universalis, though this is something many researchers are currently trying to develop, with the first ever autoimmune hair loss solution hoped to be available from around 2021.


Circ The Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Treatment for Alopecia AreataThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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