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A new Phase 4 clinical trial into the JAK inhibitor tofacitinib as a potential treatment for Alopecia Areata, started on 12th January 2019 in Thailand.

Tofacitinib (Xeljanz) being trialled as Alopecia Areata Treatment

Announced via its trial registration entry at clinicaltrials.gov, the country’s Institute of Dermatology is investigating the oral drug, also known by its brand name, Xeljanz, on all forms of hair loss caused by the autoimmune disorder.

Results are currently expected in September 2020.

First tofacitinib study in Thailand

Tofacitinib has already produced compelling hair regrowth results in trial settings for a number of patients with mild-to-moderate Alopecia Areata (patchy hair loss of the scalp only), and the more severe phenotypes Alopecia Totalis (total baldness of the scalp often accompanied by facial hair loss) and Alopecia Universalis (complete loss of hair from head to toe) in the USA.

The pharmaceutical company Aclaris Therapeutics has also been granted patents for using tofacitinib in the treatment of Alopecia Areata in America. However, this is believed to be the first investigation of its kind to take place in Thailand.

The Institute’s study author states: “The objective of this study is to assess the safety and efficacy of Tofacitinib in treating patients with extensive and recalcitrant Alopecia Areata (AA), along with to evaluate the economic impact of the patients that may be from changing in their quality of life. There are patients with severe AA who may have little or no improvement from the treatment by diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) or topical steroid with minoxidil but instead having positive response from the treatment with Janus kinase(JAK) inhibitor such as Tofacitinib or Ruxolitinib. For the best of my knowledge, there was no previous study in using Tofacitinib to treat severe AA before in Thailand.”

It is a small scale trial with only 19 participants – both male and female, all with a minimum of 50 per cent hair loss of the scalp – who are taking tofacitinib for a total of 24 weeks.

Quite why this clinical trial is billed as a ‘Phase 4’ study is unclear given Phase 4 is generally the stage that takes place after a drug has received all necessary authorisations by the relevant medical regulatory boards – such as the MHRA in the UK and the FDA in the USA – and released for prescription. It is also known as the ‘marketing surveillance’ phase where user feedback is garnered, and is on-going.

Concern over cost of JAK inhibitor treatment

One aspect of the Thai study that echoes some Western sentiments, is the cost of tofacitinib. There have been various concerns expressed as to whether the price of JAK inhibitor treatment for Alopecia Areata could be potentially prohibitive to a lot of patients.

This new study appears to be unique in that it is assessing not only the safety and efficacy of the drug, but also the ‘economic impact’ on patients. As the author says, “Tofacitinib is an expensive medicine and needed to be taken up to 6 months to finish the course to have a best outcome so it is not a popular choice of Alopecia Areata treatment at present time unless it can show a promising result in recalcitrant AA.

This is just one of many investigations into tofacitinib and a range of other JAK inhibitors, hoping to provide the first safe and effective treatment for those with the most extreme – and often distressing – forms of Alopecia Areata. Updates on all of these will be published on the Belgravia Centre hair loss blog as soon as more information becomes available.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Treatment Before and After Results - New Success Story
alert female pattern hair loss and alopecia areata the belgravia centre 09 01 2019

A new entry has just been added to Belgravia’s Female Pattern Hair Loss Treatment Success Stories gallery.

Find out what this client had to say and see her regrowth results close up, or find out more about treating hereditary hair loss in women by clicking the buttons below…

(Results may vary and are not guaranteed)

VIEW SUCCESS STORY

Alopecia Areata Treatment information Female Hair Loss Treatment information


The Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

As the new year begins, it seems we are getting increasingly closer to the possibility of even the most severe cases of Alopecia Areata becoming treatable.

On 4th January 2019, pharmaceutical titan Pfizer announced the start of its phase 2b/3 trials into its potential Alopecia Areata treatment, PF-06651600.

Developing PF-06651600 for advanced Alopecia Areata phenotypes

Pills medication tablets

This novel drug is an oral JAK inhibitor designed to treat Alopecia Areata from moderate patchy hair loss, through to Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis which cause total baldness of the head, and from head-to-toe, respectively. All of these types of hair loss are considered autoimmune disorders and hair fall occurs when the condition is triggered and the body starts to attack its own follicles resulting in sudden shedding.

At present, Alopecia Areata treatment is generally only possible for adults where it appears in the mildest form, whereby rounded bald spots and patches of hair loss occur to the scalp only.

Pfizer’s PF-06651600 received special FDA ‘Breakthrough Therapy’ designation in September 2018, potentially allowing its development to be fast-track by the American Food and Drug Administration body. It is hoped the drug trials – which involve 660 participants from 12 years of age and over with at least 50 per cent hair loss from any form of Alopecia Areata – will build upon its earlier results from previous phases.

These showed that orally administered doses of PF-0665160 improved hair regrowth within 24 weeks and was generally well-tolerated.

You can read more about how these latest trial phases will be conducted, here.

Competitive race is closing in

It is the goal of many medical professionals and companies to develop the first safe, tolerable and effective form of treatment for the more extensive Alopecia Areata phenotypes, to be authorised by the relevant medical regulatory boards, such as the MHRA and FDA.

These highly visible conditions can be emotionally distressing and psychologically traumatic for the sufferer, especially as they can come on so quickly. Therefore, finding a suitable hair loss solution has been deemed a priority by the FDA.

Whilst various clinical trials are on-going in this respect, Pfizer’s announcement shows that it may be the closest to completion. Phase 3 is the last stage of clinical trial testing before a drug is assessed for the relevant authorisations and release via prescription.

There are currently two other organisations whose novel Alopecia Areata treatments – some oral, some topical – were granted FDA ‘Fast Track’ status in 2018, with the estimated date these companies are aiming to make their medications ready for prescription (assuming relevant MHRA licenses in the UK and FDA approval in the USA are granted), understood to be 2021/2022.


The Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.  

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A Pfizer-supported hair loss study has shown that oral JAK3 inhibitors may have the potential to regrow hair in cases of moderate-to-severe Alopecia Areata.

Hair regrowth of scalp hair, eyebrows and eyelashes was witnessed during the 24-week double-blind, randomised Phase II clinical trial. The results were announced by Emma Guttman-Yassky, MD, PhD, of Icahn Medical School at Mount Sinai, New York, during a presentation at the 2018 Inflammatory Skin Disease Summit in Vienna.

Researchers are now suggesting this could be a long-term solution to the various types of Alopecia Areata – autoimmune-related hairloss conditions – once the potential effects of stopping treatment are also properly investigated.

JAK1 versus JAK3 inhibitors

According to Guttman-Yassky’s presentation and abstract information published in the Wiley online journal on 10th December 2018, two different JAK inhibitors were pitted against each other in a 142-person, placebo-controlled trial. These were a JAK3 inhibitor named PF‐06651600, and the TYK2/JAK1 inhibitor named PF‐06700841; both were administered orally, as was a placebo to the third arm of trial participants.

A 200mg dose of JAK3 was taken once per day for the first four weeks, then the group was switch to a 50mg per day dose for the remaining 20 weeks. Those taking the JAK1 inhibitor took one 60mg per day dose for the first four weeks before switching to a 30mg per day dose for the rest of the trial. All test subjects had Alopecia Areata (patchy hair loss of scalp only) or Alopecia Totalis (baldness of head only) which affected a minimum of 50 per cent of their scalp, at the time of starting the trial. Their hairloss and hair regrowth progress of scalp hair was monitored throughout using the severity of alopecia tool (SALT).

Statistically significant improvements were noted in both active JAK inhibitor groups at weeks 6 (JAK3 inhibitor) and week 4 (JAK1 inhibitor) when these pulled away from the placebo results.

Following 24 weeks of consistent treatment, the group taking TYK2/JAK1 inhibitor (PF‐06700841) saw a mean change in hair growth from baseline measurements, of 49.5, whilst the JAK3 inhibitor group saw an mean increase of 33.6.

Dr. Guttman-Yassky mentioned during her presentation that patients taking both the JAK inhibitor medications had also seen improved growth to their eyelashes and eyebrows, which was not seen in the placebo group.

Ongoing development with FDA assistance

PfizerPfizer has already been granted a ‘breakthrough designation’ by the USA’s medical regulatory board, the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) for the JAK3 inhibitor used in this trial. What this means is that trial research will be reviewed by the relevant FDA boards quickly in order to help move the product along as fast as possible.

The FDA is lending similar support to two other companies – Aclaris Therapeutics and Concert Pharmaceuticals – with regards fast-tracking their potential JAK inhibitor, or JAK inhibitor-based, treatments for all forms of Alopecia Areata. This is a key area of interest for the American body due to the current “unmet need” given, despite various Alopecia Areata treatment options existing mostly for adults with the scalp-only phenotype, none are yet FDA approved.

Anyone concerned with sudden and/or patchy hair loss should seek assistance from their GP; however, if this is confined to just the scalp, with rounded bald spots appearing, a hair loss specialist can also offer counsel and treatment recommendations, where appropriate.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.


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How do you find it most convenient to take your vitamins? For some people it appears the answer doesn’t involve taking a daily tablet, but rather involves having nutrients delivered via intravenous drip.

The latest health fad for IV drips as nutritional supports is becoming increasingly popular in the UK’s capital, with one London ‘drip bar’ even having a Hair Enhancement offering on its menu.

Get A Drip in Shoreditch’s Boxpark mall offers a Hair Enhancement IV drip for £200-£295 per session. One drip promises to deliver ‘basic hydration’ (sodium chloride, bicarbonate, potassium and calcium) plus B complex, amino acids, methionine 750mg, zinc and vitamin B12 methylcobalamin. These ingredients are remarkably similar to some of the ingredients contained in Belgravia’s exclusive one-a-day Hair Vitalics food supplements, though without the benefit of gender-specific formulations.

IV drip nutrition vitamins supplement hair enhancementSo are IV drips the new food supplement when it comes to healthy hair? We spoke to Belgravia senior hair loss specialist and superintendent pharmacist prescriber, Christina Chikaher, to find out more about nutrition and supplementation…

IV drips for hair supplementation

“Vitamin Drips have recently become quite trendy and, despite the exorbitant cost, they are even popping up at parties now – a drip bar as well as a regular bar. We have to consider why one would want a vitamin drip, besides any ‘fashionable’ element,” explains Christina.

“Do you want a vitamin drip because you are lacking energy? Maybe it’s a substitute for eating a healthier diet? Or perhaps you see it as the antidote for a stressful lifestyle? If any of these apply to you then you should strongly consider getting to the root cause of the issue – quick fixes are not a long-term solution.”

“Most healthy people are able to get enough of the relevant nutrients from an appropriate, balanced diet. However, where this is not achievable – for instance, people who experience malabsorption – in many cases a simple oral supplementation of vitamins at an appropriate dose should be enough to correct most nutritional deficiencies within a matter of weeks,” she advises.

“Our bodies are designed to ingest the majority of essential nutrients orally – not through a drip in our arm. Taken orally, the amount of vitamins absorbed by the body is limited by the digestive system. Given by IV it enters the blood stream directly, there is the potential for serious overdose. Vitamin drips and injections can also be dangerous if not carried out correctly and can result in complications.”

“Should anyone wish to try intravenous infusions as a way to boost their hair health, we would advise ensuring you use a reputable company with sterile equipment and investigate how regularly they should be undertaken for your specific needs and stick with this. Furthermore, and particularly where you have any existing health issues, checking with your GP or other healthcare practitioner and discussing concerns with your IV consultant before booking an appointment, just to minimise the risk of any potential adverse events.”

Nutrition, hair growth and hair loss

There are many products and therapies that claim to reduce hair loss, promote hair growth or otherwise benefit the hair. Very few are actually clinically-proven and properly licensed for these purposes, however, so it is always wise to do the necessary research before spending your money. Regularly consuming too much or too little of certain nutrients can even cause thinning hair so it’s important to understand what you’re ingesting and why.

Nutritional items such as food supplements are not as highly-regulated as medications – such as pharmaceutical hair loss treatments – in the UK, though claims regarding certain ingredients in supplements are monitored by government agencies. A cursory internet search for ‘hair vitamins’ or ‘hair supplements’ will prove that this does not stop some retailers from misleadingly promoting products from onion juice to pomegranate seed oil as hair growth products or hair loss solutions.

There are a number of nutrients which are able to support healthy hair growth BUT there are no vitamins or minerals currently recognised as being safe and effective for treating hair loss when it is genetic (Male Pattern Baldness or Female Pattern Hair Loss), autoimmune-related (Alopecia Areata) or the result of external factors such as tight hairstyles (Traction Alopecia). In these instances a specialist consultation is required to investigate pharmaceutical treatment options which can be used on their own or alongside other hair growth supporting products, such as highly-targeted food supplements.

For example, biotin, selenium and zinc are the only vitamins and minerals with permitted ‘hair growth’ claims attached to them in the UK. This is because each has been proven to directly support the maintenance of normal hair growth. All three of these ingredients are present in both Hair Vitalics for Men and Hair Vitalics for Women alongside a host of other key vitamins, minerals, amino acids and botanical extracts.

Although other ingredients, from calcium to vitamin C, may support separate functions which, as a result of their optimum functioning, may be beneficial to hair health, no claims can be made regarding those components due to the effect being indirect.

It is also worth noting that following a healthy, balanced diet is important for everyone’s overall health, not just that of their hair, and neither IV drips nor food supplements are intended to replace this. They are simply convenient methods with which to ‘top up’ your dietary intake.


The Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.


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Aclaris Therapeutics, one of a handful of pharmaceutical companies at the forefront of developments regarding the use of janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor drugs to treat autoimmune-related hair loss, has provided an end-of-year update for 2018.

The key talking points were its topical and oral JAK 1/3 inhibitors which were granted FDA Fast Track status in July 2018 as part of the American medical regulatory board’s bid to introduce its first approved treatment for all forms of Alopecia Areata.

Diagram Belgravia Centre Different Types of Alopecia Areata autoimmune hair loss

Areas affected by hair loss shown in blue

Alopecia Areata takes three main forms – patchy hair loss of the scalp only (Alopecia Areata), complete baldness of the scalp which can also be accompanied by loss of facial hair including eyebrows and eyelashes (Alopecia Totalis) and total hairless-ness, where the body rejects all hair from head to toe.

It is the third most common hair loss condition worldwide behind Male and Female Pattern Baldness, and can affect men, women and children of all ages, races and hair types, though generally strikes before 40 years of age.

Whilst it is considered an autoimmune disorder, the precise cause is unknown in all forms of Alopecia Areata, though triggers, including sudden shock and trauma, certain allergies and a genetic element have all been identified.

On-going Phase II clinical trials for topical JAK inhibitors

Two separate Phase 2 topical JAK inhibitor trials, of ATI-502 for the treatment of Alopecia Areata are currently underway, known by the reference codes AA-202 and AUATB-201.

The AA-202 Topical trial of ATI-502 is taking place in Australia and features 11 patients with Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis.

Meanwhile in the USA, 12 patients with eyebrow hair loss as a result of Alopecia Areata, Totalis or Universalis, are having this specific area treated with AT1-502 in the AUATB-201 Topical trial.

medicine spoon oral liquidA larger-scale, 129-patient randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess the safety, efficacy and dosage responses of ATI-502 in cases of patchy, scalp-only Alopecia Areata was confirmed as fully enrolled in November 2018. Initial findings from this trial are due between April and June 2019.

Oral JAK inhibitor trial results expected late 2019

In December 2018 Aclaris advised patient enrolment had been completed for a separate trial – ref. AUAT-201 Oral – of an oral suspension of ATI-501.

This randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study will comprise 87 participants with Alopecia Areata, Totalis and Universalis.

Each will receive either ATI-501 in liquid form, or a placebo, with measurements noted in terms of hair regrowth changes between each individual’s baseline and Week 24 score, using SALT readings (Severity of Alopecia Tool). This is the same evaluation methodology being used in both Aclaris’ topical ATI-501 clinical trial assessments.

Initial AUAT-201 trial data regarding the safety, efficacy and dose response of three concentrations of ATI-501 is expected to be released between July and September 2019.

Updates on the latest developments in hair loss treatments for all these conditions, from Aclaris and the various others actively working in this sector, will be published on the Belgravia blog as soon as new information becomes available.


The Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.


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HairlossANSWERS - Click to Submit Your Query to Our Hair Loss Experts

Name: Manon

Question: I have no hair on my head from Alopecia Areata. Can I get a hair transplant? Will this correct it?

Answer: Hi, Manon. The hair loss you describe suggests you have one of the more extensive Alopecia Areata phenotypes, all thought to be caused by an autoimmune disorder.

Alopecia Areata causes patchy hair loss which, whilst it may be widespread across the entire scalp, does not lead to total baldness. Both Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis, however, do lead to a bald scalp. In the case of Alopecia Totalis facial hair, including brows and lashes, may also be lost, whilst Alopecia Universalis causes the entire head and body to become hairless.

In order to have a hair transplant it is necessary to have donor hair follicles; these should be of good quality, capable of normal healthy hair growth and they should be available in sufficient quantity to fill the required recipient site.

The problem with hair restoration surgery for any form of Alopecia Areata, but particularly the more severe forms, is the lack of properly functioning hair follicles to act as donors. Although some highly-specialised surgeons may use body hair as donor follicles where scalp follicles are unsuitable or missing, this is a novel and far from widespread approach, and therefore one which you would need to seek advice on directly from a reputable practitioner. Given chest hair is typically used, it is also not likely to be viable for women or those with hairless chests.

Due to the loss of body hair, in cases of Alopecia Universalis this would not be an option, however, in any patient with these kinds of autoimmune-related hair loss, the procedure is unlikely to produce satisfactory results. The reason for this is the volatility of these conditions. Especially where the scalp-only mild-to-moderate phenotype is concerned, Alopecia Areata hair regrowth may spontaneously resume, though bald spots may reappear at a later date and may present anywhere on the scalp – not necessarily in the same position each time. If or when this may happen cannot be predicted and the chance of natural hair growth re-starting lessens in line with the severity of the form of Alopecia experienced.

For these reasons in particular, we consider a hair transplant for Alopecia Areata to be inadvisable regardless of the particular phenotype. However, there are alternative, non-surgical hair loss solutions which may be worth exploring via your GP; they can also update you on the treatments currently in development – the first of which are expected to be released by 2022 – to treat Alopecia Totalis and Universalis.

Although Belgravia clinics offer Alopecia Areata treatment, this is for adults with the scalp-only phenotype and is not suitable for those with the more extensive forms.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.


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A new study has backed the long-standing theory that trauma or intense stress may trigger certain autoimmune disorders, including Alopecia Areata.

The University of Iceland in Reykjavik published a report in the summer of 2018 investigating links between autoimmune disease and stress. This concluded that stress-related disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were “significantly associated” with a risk of those affected developing subsequent autoimmune disorders.

what is an autoimmune disorder information alopecia areataThese conditions included type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, coeliac disease and Alopecia Areata.

Up to 40 per cent extra risk

Using 1981-2013 data from a Swedish register, the Icelandic team conducted a study exploring 106,464 patients with stress-related disorders, each population-matched to individuals without any such diagnosis, and 121,652 full siblings. Siblings were used to assess any potential genetic, familial associations.

The stress diagnoses the exposed group registered included PTSD, acute stress reaction, and adjustment disorder. It was noted that the median age at which these diagnoses were received was 41 years of age, with women making up the majority of these patients (60 per cent female versus 40 per cent male). It was noted that previous research into PTSD and autoimmune disorders tended to revolve around military-based, men-only studies.

The reason for the study was to try and establish firm links between forms of stress and autoimmune disease. The study author writes:

“Individuals with such stress-related disorders experience an array of physiologic alterations, including disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous system, which in turn may influence multiple bodily systems, eg, immune function, and thereby susceptibility to disease.

Manifested as abnormal immune reaction in specific organs or bodily systems, autoimmune disease may be influenced by psychiatric reactions to life stressors. Although animal data lend support to a potential link, epidemiological evidence underpinning the association between stress-related disorders and autoimmune diseases in humans is limited.”

Researchers found the risk of people with PTSD or another stress diagnosis developing one of 41 autoimmune disorders was 30-40 per cent greater than those without. The full study findings were published on the JAMA Network website.

Stress-related alopecia

Whilst stress is a well-known factor in a number of different hair loss conditions, these generally present as thinning hair from all over the scalp around three months after being sparked. Alopecia Areata, on the other hand, can affect various hair-bearing areas of the head and body, all of which come on suddenly.

Mild to moderate Alopecia Areata involves patchy hair loss developing on the scalp only; these bald spots can be singular or multiple and as small as a £2 coin to far larger rounded areas. Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis are more extensive, causing total baldness of the head and from head-to-toe, respectively.

The shedding starts when a trigger – which could range from shock or trauma, to allergies or skin injuries – causes the body to start attacking its own hair follicles. This disrupts the hair growth cycle for follicles in the affected areas, prematurely shunting actively growing hairs into the dormant Telogen phase during which hair is shed. These follicles remain stuck in this stage with no way of knowing whether or not they will resume normal hair growth of their own accord, and – if so – when this may happen.

In cases of the mildest, scalp-only form, hair regrowth will usually begin again spontaneously within 12 months, though treatment is also possible to help accelerate this process. This outcome is less likely, and effective treatment options far more limited at present, for the more severe phenotypes.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.


Related Stories


No matter the condition, it is a widely accepted fact that hair loss can have a negative effect on people’s confidence and self-esteem.

In a rare study comparing the quality of life of those with genetic versus autoimmune alopecia, researchers have found that one group is considerably more emotionally affected than the other.

Male and Female Pattern Hair Loss are permanent, progressive hereditary conditions which cause thinning hair to the top of the scalp from hairline to scalp, with men tending to experience more extensive and defined areas, such as a receding hairline and/or thinning crown, whereas women tend to develop severe hair thinning diffusely at their vertex and temporal regions but rarely go bald as a result.

Alopecia Areata is an autoimmune disorder whereby sudden hair loss is triggered and the body mistakenly attacks its own hair follicles. This can lead to anything from patchy bald spots on the scalp only, to complete baldness from head to toe, depending on the severity of the phenotype experienced.

Pattern hair loss more distressing than previously thought

click to view trial data charts research study information findings resultsThe An Bras Dermatol, the medical journal of the Brazilian Society of Dermatology published the findings from a 2018 Turkish study entitled “Comparison of quality of life in patients with androgenetic alopecia and alopecia areata”.

It was pursued because, although hair loss can often be viewed as a ‘cosmetic issue’, there are often significant accompanying psychological symptoms. As the researchers note, these can involve “lower personal attractiveness, negative self-esteem, fear of growing old, and negative repercussions on social life”.

The research involved 82 patients with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) – 30 with Male Pattern Baldness and 52 with Female Pattern Hair Loss – and 56 Alopecia Areata (AA) patients (25 women, 31 men).  The extent of each participant’s hairloss was measured according to the relevant scale; pattern hair loss in men was charted using the Norwood-Hamilton scale, and the Ludwig scale for women, whilst the Severity of Alopecia tool (SALT) was used for those with Alopecia Areata.

Each individual was evaluated using the Hairdex scale and a Turkish quality of life tool (TQL), which is essentially a condition-specific questionnaire filled out by the participants. It was noted that the ‘validity and reliability’ of the Hairdex index has not yet been established in Turkey.

This data was then compared based on a number of criteria including age, gender, employment status, education and the severity of hair loss. For women only, whether they wore headscarves or not was also taken into consideration.

After assessing the results, findings showed that, although Alopecia Areata negatively impacted the quality of life of those affected, it was genetic hair loss – particularly in women – which proved to have the most significant effect in this regard.

AGA patients are affected from the disorder more than previously thought. Dermatologists should thus be aware of this distressing condition, recognizing the increasing need for improvement in patients’ quality of life. Male patients can cope with the disease over time. Alopecia has an impact on QoL regardless of educational level and may affect unemployed AA patients to a higher degree. Disease severity causes more anxiety in women, independently of whether they wear headscarves,” concluded the study authors.

Options for addressing hair loss

Feeling alone in their struggle is a common sentiment among both men and women with hair loss, though this is certainly not the case. Whilst Female Pattern Hair Loss and Alopecia Areata may be less spoken about than Male Pattern Baldness, all these conditions affect a number of people worldwide. Furthermore, support is available in each instance too.

There are clinically-proven genetic hair loss treatments available, and whilst the topical medication, high strength minoxidil, has only been MHRA licensed and FDA approved for male and female pattern baldness, it is understood to have a wider scope of application and has been seen to produce hair growth results as an Alopecia Areata treatment. A hair loss specialist will be able to make appropriate recommendations for suitable options following a diagnostic consultation.

For those whose shedding cannot be treated, usually because the hair follicles have deteriorated to far in cases of Male Pattern Hair Loss, or in the severe iterations of Alopecia Areata – Alopecia Totalis or Alopecia Universalis – peer support and even professional counselling may be helpful. This can often be arranged via a GP or recommendations made via a dedicated hair loss charity.


The Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.


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A brave teenager from Devon has spoken out about being severely bullied from the age of 13, after going bald in just two weeks.

Alopecia Totalis – a more extensive form of the autoimmune-disorder Alopecia Areata – which causes baldness of the head, often including losing facial hair such as eyebrows and eyelashes, set in. It is thought to have been triggered due to the stress of coping with her parents getting divorced. Trauma and severe stress are known to spark this type of autoimmune-related hairloss.

Sudden hair loss started with tiny patches

Charlotte Wilson JustGivingThe resilient 17 year old, Charlotte Wilson, has now formed an online support group and share her experiences with the public in order to help others with hair loss – including releasing a beautiful photograph of her without a wig. “I started loosing tiny patches in year 9/10 and within two weeks of being bullied it all fell out. My hair used to be down to bum before this so this literally turned my life around,” she says.

Wilson, who faced such extreme bullying both in person and online as a result of going bald that she was forced to change school, also encourages people who encounter those with hairloss to “think before you speak.” She points out that “everyone has feelings and just a little comment could affect someone in such massive ways.”

This is something both children and adults with Alopecia Areata often report; basketball star Charlie Villanueva who has Alopecia Universalis – the most extreme phenotype which causes complete hair loss from head to toe – released an open letter to his childhood bullies after enduring similar issues to Charlotte when he was growing up.

Alopecia Areata treatment is generally only suitable for over 16s with the scalp-only form at present, however, current research suggests treatments for all forms of Alopecia may be available by 2022.

Helping others to afford wigs

Charlotte Wilson is also crowdfunding to help others who are losing their hair to afford wigs which, she explains, are expensive – her family have spent over £10,000 so far on wigs and counselling appointments for her – but can make such a difference.

Wig“I have been so lucky that I have had people that helped put money towards my wigs and counselling sessions. And I thought to myself the other night why should other people have to suffer simply because they can’t afford these things. I have formed a Facebook community in where other people like me discuss their problems and needing help funding for wigs. There are many people out there that can help but they can’t reach everybody. I would like to try and help people out there that can’t afford a wig.

Alopecia can happen to anyone at anytime it’s scary. And when you can’t afford a wig you really feel trapped and I have been so so lucky in which I’m in the position that my family helps me. So if I could help a few people to make themselves feel better in anyway I will do that. I’m donating all my Christmas money to helping other people with not only alopecia but hair loss from other conditions. We all have a right to feel beautiful. I know what it’s like to feel no self worth and it’s awful,” writes Wilson on her donation page.

Another solution those in need of wigs due to medical hair loss may find worthwhile exploring is the Little Princess Trust, which also encompasses the male division Hero by LPT. This much-loved British hair loss charity supplies real hair wigs, made from hair donated by its supporters, to children and young adults in need.


The Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.


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