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Former Manchester United left-back and football pundit, Patrice Evra has revealed he is having a hair transplant to deal with advancing hair loss.

In a video posted to his official Instagram account, the controversial star – who has just returned to Manchester United as a trainee coach, working in the club’s youth academy – revealed his plans for tackling his clear case of Male Pattern Baldness.

Known for his often off-beat sense of humour, Senegalese Evra said the reason for wanting his “Jackson 5” back was “I don’t want to be called mini Malteser” adding that his bald big brother, Dominique, is known as Big Malteser, after the smooth, round chocolates.

Tried to hide his hairline

“This is my confession, I am losing my hair,” he says in the Instagram video posted on 8th October 2019. “I tried hiding it with polishes and by staying like that…” he adds, leaning back so his receding hairline and thinning on top is hidden from the camera. Continues below…

The ‘polishes’ he refers to are most likely hair loss concealers which are painted on, the most famous of which is Bigen. It is a very dark powder dye which is mixed into a paste and applied to the hair and scalp to give the appearance of fuller hair. Whilst it can work as a cosmetic illusion if done well, if it is done badly it tends to look cartoonishly unnatural as any Google search for ‘Bigen Blackout’ will show.

This type of hair loss solution tends to gradually wear off and faded remains can be seen as the 38-year old leans in to the camera to show his thinning hair.

Opting for hair transplant surgery

Tagging a Canada-based hair transplant clinic in his post, Patrice Evra tells him, “Doc, I want my Jackson 5 back, I want my Marouane Fellaini before letting his 6.5 million followers, “I’m not fake, I’m not a magician – if you see me one day with a lot of hair, I find hair somewhere.”

Whether or not he has actually gone ahead with the surgery remains unclear as, despite regular posts on social media, he shows none of the signs associated with having a hair transplant. These can include a shaved head and raised, inflamed ‘bumps’ in the donor and recipient areas of the scalp.

In a post from 17th October, just 9 days later, he mentions again in a motivational Instagram video, “Winter is coming and my hair is coming back too! My Jackson Five is coming back!”

If Patrice Evra’s hair is regrowing without surgery, it could be that he has started a course of male hair loss treatment featuring one or both of the medications high strength minoxidil (topical) and finasteride 1mg (oral).

These clinically-proven hair loss solutions have both been MHRA-licensed and FDA-approved for the treatment of male pattern baldness, and have been seen to help regrow hair in cases where follicles are still active.

Given Evra does not appear to have gone bald just yet, this makes him a valid candidate for non-surgical hairloss treatment which may be further bolstered by the addition of hair growth supporting products.

These include low-level laser home-use device options such as the LaserBand, which is worn for between 90 seconds and 3 minutes, 3 times per week and stimulates the follicles, and Hair Vitalics for Men supplements which contain key ingredients including biotin, zinc and selenium, to support the maintenance of normal, healthy hair growth.

A personalised course comprising optimum products for each individual is tailored for them, based on their condition, level and pattern of shedding and their medical profile following a professional consultation with a dedicated hair loss specialist.

Whatever route he is taking, we wish Patrice Evra the best of luck in preventing baldness and regrowing his Jackson 5, and look forward to monitoring its progress during his TV punditry sessions.


Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinic Hair Loss Specialist Free ConsultationThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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Belgravia specialists are often asked about different scalp or hair oils which may help in the treatment of hair loss.

Those most commonly enquired about include coconut oil, argan oil, castor oil and jojoba oil.

The truth is, there are no hair care products of any type that have been clinically-proven to treat key conditions, such as Male Pattern Baldness, Female Pattern Hair Loss or Alopecia Areata.

So whilst the short answer to whether cosmetic hair and scalp oils can treat hairloss on their own is ‘no’, there are some benefits associated with their use.

Here we look specifically at using jojoba oil as part of a hair regimen.

jojoba oil

What is jojoba oil?

The jojoba plant, also known botanically as simmondsia chinensis, is a dioecious shrub native to Mexico and South Western regions of the USA. It produces seeds rich in jojoba liquid wax ester, commonly known as jojoba oil.

It has a high fatty acid content which comprises a number of different types, predominantly monounsaturated omega 9 and omega 7 oils, including palmitoleic acid, oleic acid, 11-Eicosenoic acid, erucic acid and nervonic acid.

These, particularly oleic acid, are thought to have some metabolic health and cancer prevention benefits when ingested; when applied topically, omega-9 preparations can provide various advantages. These include enhancing the activity of antioxidants, as well as providing softening, hydrating properties. They may also help to protect against signs of environmental damage, skin and hair ageing.

A 2005 clinical study of the anti-inflammatory properties of jojoba liquid wax discovered through animals trials that the substance showed similar levels of efficacy to the prescription drug indomethacin.

As inflammation plays a part in many different hair loss conditions, whilst it may not increase hair growth, treat thinning hair or bald spots, it may be useful as a natural anti-inflammatory.

It may also help to prevent damaged hair and hair breakage, which is where weakened hair snaps along the shaft but the follicle is not affected.

Shown to increase minoxidil absorption

Oleic acid has been shown in some clinical trials, to increase the skin penetration of certain topical medications.

woman applying hair loss solution product hair growth

One such drug, studied in 2018, was the only clinically-proven hair loss treatment currently both MHRA-licensed and FDA-approved for androgenetic alopecia in men and women: high strength minoxidil.

In vitro testing – not human trials – showed significantly improved hair follicle delivery of the researchers’ minoxidil-oleic acid formulation when compared to minoxidil alone.

This does not mean anyone using this particular hair loss solution should start mixing it with jojoba oil – or any other oleic acid-containing oil such as olive oil – however; that would most likely just dilute the medication and reduce its efficacy.

You can, if you wish, apply jojoba oil at least an hour before, or at least an hour after applying minoxidil, as a moisturiser to help keep the scalp in good condition. After all, a healthy scalp is important when it comes to healthy hair growth.

Further studies are needed, including large scale clinical trials including human participants, to ensure the long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of such a concoction. It does provide hairloss researchers with an interesting springboard from which to potentially develop new hair loss products in the future, though.

For now, for those wanting to add hair oils or scalp oils into their general hair routine, we consider jojoba oil to be a safe choice in the majority of cases, with known benefits whether applied to the lengths and strands as a moisturiser, or directly to the scalp to help reduce any inflammation.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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Director of Fashion partnerships for Instagram and children’s author, Eva Chen is a popular figure on the image-sharing app, frequently sharing style tips and stories from her life as a busy mum-of-two in New York City.

Her regular Ask Me Anything (AMA) Instagram story sessions give her 1.2 million followers the chance to have their questions answered.

In her latest AMA, she offered some unique advice on how to cope with hair loss after having a baby, a condition known as Postpartum Alopecia.

Eva Chen Instagram Postpartum hair loss style advice

On-trend hair loss solution for new mums

“Oh boy, that is the absolute worse!!!” Chen, 39, wrote in response to someone asking how she coped with postpartum hairloss – the shedding that starts shortly after giving birth.

During pregnancy the hair growth cycle stays in its active ‘Anagen’ phase for longer than usual, resulting in the less shedding than normal during this time.

People – including those without any form of hair loss condition – tend lose around 100 or more hairs per day, However, during pregnancy more of these hairs which would normally be shed as a normal part of hair cycling are ‘hoarded’. This is why it is often noted that pregnant women appear to have fuller hair.

Once the baby has been born, these additional hairs – which, having built up over a period of up to nine months, is a substantial amount – start to shed as the hair cycle returns to normal. The ensuing diffuse hairloss affects the entire scalp, but is temporary.

“Honestly, there isn’t much to be done but wait it out,” advises Eva Chen, who was previously the beauty and health director at Teen Vogue, adding: “I wore a lot of headbands! Lucky for you they’re trending!”

Postpartum regrowth options

Whilst Chen’s stylish suggestion may be a practical and fashion-forward quick fix for new mums wanting to hide their hair loss, there are a number of other options.

After having a baby it can take between 6 and 12 months for hair to naturally return to its pre-pregnancy state.

For those wishing to aid the hair regrowth process along, there are options available but it is important to note that these are for mothers who are not breastfeeding or expressing. Belgravia hair specialists advise those who are nursing not to try any of these solutions until they have finished, simply as a precaution.

Women who are not breastfeeding may explore pharmaceutical postpartum hair loss treatment options, as well as nutritional support from hair supplements designed to help maintain the normal functioning of the hair growth cycle.

Hair Vitalics for Women - hair supplement from The Belgravia Centre hair growth specialists London hair loss clinic

Maintaining a balanced, healthy diet full of nutrients is always advised, but is not always the reality once a new baby comes along.

Belgravia offers an exclusive one-a-day food supplement called Hair Vitalics for Women which is suitable for those who are not nursing. These contain a highly-targeted blend of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and botanical extracts, including biotin, selenium, zinc, iron, vitamins C and D3, as well as phytoestrogens, but are not intended to replace a good diet. Hair Vitalics is available to both clients and non-clients, who can purchase via the dedicated hairvitalics.com website.

In addition, the use of low-level laser therapy hair growth supporting products may be beneficial.

The FDA-cleared HairMax LaserBand devices, for example, offer a quick way to stimulate the follicles, with medical-grade lasers and patented teeth to part the hair, being embedded in headband style wearable gadgets. These are worn three times per week for between 90 seconds and 3 minutes each time, depending on the model used.

HairMax LaserBand 41 hair growth LLLT device buy from The Belgravia Centre hair loss clinic London

For those concerned about on-going levels of excessive hair fall that does not appear to be subsiding a few months after giving birth, a consultation with a professional hair loss specialist is highly recommended, whether in-person, or online.

Firstly, for those with either existing Female Pattern Hair Loss, or an underlying genetic predisposition to this hereditary concern, Post-partum alopecia may exacerbate or trigger this type of shedding.

Whilst hair loss after having a baby affects the entire scalp diffusely on a temporary basis, Female Pattern Hair Loss is concentrated on the top of the scalp, presenting as thinning hair from the crown to the hairline and temples, and is a progressive, permanent condition.

Should this be diagnosed, there are a number of hair loss treatments which can be offered, as well as those outlined above, and a custom course can be tailored based on your condition(s), level and pattern of hairloss, as well as your medical profile.

Secondly, receiving an expert diagnosis and personalised advice about your hair loss can be a huge relief and one less thing to worry about.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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Gut health is not just a hot wellness trend.

The gastrointestinal tract has long been considered the root of good health in Asian medicine, whilst the Western world only started to show significant medical interest over the past 10 years or so.

This is despite the founder of modern medicine, the Greek physician Hippocrates who died in 370BC, famously stating “all disease begins in the gut”.

Researchers in Spain recently conducted a cross-sectional study to establish whether gut microbiota played a role in the autoimmune disorder, Alopecia Areata. Specifically, they were looking for links to its most severe phenotype, Alopecia Universalis.

stomach gut health

Whereas the mild form of Alopecia Areata presents as patchy hair loss to the scalp only, Alopecia Universalis causes complete baldness from head-to-toe.

All forms can be distressing as the hair growth cycle becomes suspended, resulting in sudden hairloss with the length of time this will remain ‘stuck’ being unpredictable.

There are Alopecia Areata treatments available for the scalp-only type, which will often see spontaneous hair regrowth resume within 12 months, too. However, for the more extensive iterations, including Alopecia Universalis, treatments tend to be less successful and the conditions are generally on-going. There are currently no MHRA-licensed nor FDA-approved treatments for Alopecia Areata, though many are in development.

Although the underlying mechanisms that cause all types of autoimmune alopecia are still unknown, various triggers have been identified. These include sudden shock and trauma, allergies, hormones and a genetic element is also suspected.

Possible bacterial biomarkers

A team comprising researchers from various medical institutions in Madrid, compared the gut health of 15 patients with Alopecia Universalis and 15 healthy control participants.

In the study report published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology on 16th August 2019, the methodology is explained: “Gut microbiome of the study subjects was analysed by sequencing the 16SrRNA of stool samples. We searched for bacterial biomarkers of alopecia universalis using the linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEFse) tool.”

Of the 30 subjects, 46.6 per cent were women and 53.4 per cent were male and no statistically significant difference was noted in gut bacteria based on gender.

Normal Hair Growth Cycle versus Hair Growth in Alopecia Areata

However, the team noted that an “enriched presence (LDA SCORE > 2) of Holdemania filiformis, Erysipelotrichacea, Lachnospiraceae, Parabacteroides johnsonii, Clostridiales vadin BB60 group, Bacteroides eggerthii and Parabacteroides distasonis” was seen in the participants with Alopecia Universalis.

Furthermore, they advised that a “predictive model based on the number of bacterial counts of Parabacteroides distasonis and Clostridiales vadin BB60 group correctly predicted disease status in 80% of patients…”

It was concluded that, although this study showed that Alopecia Universalis “does not seem to affect broadly gut microbiota structure” more research was needed as there were a number of bacterial biomarkers found which were associated with the disease and these may be involved in the condition’s pathophysiology. Alternatively, their presence could be used to assist in diagnosing the disorder, which can affect men, women and children of any age, race or hair type.

Novartis looking to revist alopecia areata treatment research?

Pharmaceutical company, Novartis contributed to the financing of this Spanish study. This may indicate that the Swiss multinational is considering revisiting a foray into developing Alopecia Areata hair loss solutions.

In 2015 Novartis started clinical trials into its biological, interleukin-17A-blocking drug, secukinumab – which goes under the brand name Cosentyx – to determine whether it could be a potential treatment for Alopecia Areata.

At present – October 2019 – however, there is no mention of this trial, nor any other research into Alopecia Areata in any of its forms, in the company’s pipeline reports. Should any new information come to light on this, we will publish updates here on the Belgravia blog.

In the meantime, adults concerned about sudden hair fall from the scalp should contact a dermatologist or hair loss specialist, whilst children or those with shedding in other areas of the face or body, should speak to their doctor as a first port of call.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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The 28th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Congress has kicked off in Madrid, Spain, with some interesting news for both drivers and passengers.

A presentation from South Korea’s Future Science Research Centre explained how air pollution has been shown to negatively affect hair growth in ways which can lead to hair loss.

Reduces levels of important hair growth proteins

The Anatomy of a Hair Follicle

The South Korean team exposed extracted dermal papilla (DP) cells – those located at the bottom of the hair follicle and which play a vital role in the formation and growth of human hair – to various concentrations of polluted air for 24 hours.

At the end of the test, the hairs were examined to investigate whether any differences had occurred to their key growth proteins.

Not only were beta-catenin, cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK2 levels found to be decreased – significantly in the case of beta-catenin, which is responsible for new hairs forming normally – but these effects were found to be dose-dependent. Essentially, the more polluted the air the DP cells were exposed to, the greater their reduction of important hair growth proteins.

“While the link between air pollution and serious diseases such as cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well established, there is little to no research on the effect of particulate matter exposure on the human skin, and hair in particular,” says team member Hyuk Chul Kwon.

“Our research explains the mode of action of air pollutants on human follicle dermal papilla cells, showing how the most common air pollutants lead to hair loss.”

Expands upon previous research into hair loss and air pollution

traffic congestion lights stop halt pollution london

Despite the researcher’s claim that there has been a lack of study in this area, there has certainly been some investigation of this area before.

The new South Korean data appears to expand upon findings from previous research in both the USA and the UK that also linked air pollution to hair loss.

A 2017 study by researchers at Duke University in America demonstrated that air pollution from traffic can cause hairloss. They understood this to be because exhaust pollutants were present in far greater quantities inside vehicles than in the air outside.

Furthermore, the pollution contained high levels of the chemicals that cause oxidative stress – also known as free-radical damage – which has also been associated with thinning hair and identified as a trigger for the premature onset of Male Pattern Baldness.

Before that, in 2009 a team from the college of medicine at Queen Mary University of London, UK, linked traffic pollution to baldness after discovering that toxic air pollutants can damage vital hair proteins.

Whilst each of these earlier projects was small in scale, they have produced insightful information which, in addition to the new findings, certainly compounds the case for more trials in this area. Additionally, this could now be used to help find ways to protect the hair from such pollutants in order to prevent hair loss.

Could be the reason for rising hair loss problems

In recent years there have been increasing complaints about rising levels of Male Pattern Baldness and Female Pattern Hair Loss from residents of China, India and the United Arab Emirates. Continues below…

WHO World Health Organisation Global ambient air pollution map 2018 - hair loss and air pollution
Click to Enlarge the 2018 World Health Organisation Global Ambient Air Pollution Map

Although the precise reason for this apparently sudden increase in cases of thinning hair in men and sometimes women has not yet been identified, it was largely assumed to be down to stress.

This was based on the fact that modern lives are becoming increasingly stressful and unbalanced, with people tending to get less sleep and recreational time than before, plus everyday diets not always being as healthy as they could be due to the smorgasbord of convenience food offerings available which often have poor nutritional values – all factors known to contribute to hair loss.

However, the correlation between this pattern of research outcomes and the fact that these countries all have some of the worst air pollution in the world, based on the 2018 survey from the World Health Organisation (WHO), does seem to lend itself to high levels of air pollution being a possible factor.

Without going full Greta Thunberg and avoiding all forms of non eco-friendly transport, things you can do to help reduce the effects of air pollution on the hair include wearing a hat and washing your hair when you come in each day.

Having good quantities of antioxidants in your diet may also be beneficial, with vitamin C, selenium and zinc all known to contribute to the protection of cells from oxidative stress. These nutrients are all included in the exclusive Belgravia food supplements, Hair Vitalics for Men and Hair Vitalics for Women, though these are not intended to replace a healthy, balanced diet.

Where air pollution is exacerbating, or triggering Male or Female Pattern Baldness, a personalised hair loss treatment course featuring clinically-proven medications and, where appropriate, additional hair growth supporting products, may be advantageous.


The Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

Related Stories


An American tabloid magazine has made headlines after appearing to cover up Prince Harry’s thinning hair in a recent publication.

Us Weekly published photos from the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s first official Royal Tour of Southern Africa. Whilst images of the couple were widely published around the world, there was something about the Us Weekly photos which didn’t match the others – Prince Harry’s hair loss, or rather, his sudden lack of it.

Despite HRH having had clear signs of Male Pattern Baldness – which he himself has acknowledged many times over the years – the magazine appeared to have ‘touched up’ his increasingly thinning crown, giving him a notably increased hair density.

Prince Harry Thinning Crown Male Pattern Baldness Hair Loss Royal Family
The cover of US Weekly featuring a photo taken on Prince Harry, Meghan Markle and their son, Archie during the October 2019 Royal Tour of Africa

Hair cloning

Harry’s hair has been gradually thinning on top – a typical symptom of hereditary hair loss and the result of a process called follicular miniaturisation – yet the cover of an October 2019 edition of Us Weekly showed the prince with thicker hair especially around his crown.

Unlike current hair cloning advancements being developed, where Male Pattern Hair Loss is treated using stem cell replication, this type of ‘hair cloning’ appears to be the work of image manipulation software, such as Photoshop.

This commonly-used programme allows users to ‘clone’ hair from one area of the photo and place it onto sparser areas of the scalp, as well as darkening the crown area to further imply there is less hair loss than we are used to seeing him with on the news and in other photos, including those on the Duke’s own social media channels.

While some celebrities are known to indulge in a technique called Beauty Work to prevent any perceived ‘flaws’ from becoming public, Prince Harry’s hair loss and that of his brother, Prince William, or indeed any of the male members of the British Royal Family, has never been hidden.

Whilst Harry was rumoured to have tried hair supplements and drops – most likely the clinically-proven hair loss solution, high strength minoxidil – to help him in preventing baldness, it would appear neither he, nor his older brother, have tried a comprehensive course of male hair loss treatment.

What may have been a misguided act of flattery has backfired somewhat, with the Photoshop fail being reported in the media and shared across the internet, drawing more attention to Prince Harry’s balding.

Stress making hair loss worse?

Since the time of Prince Harry’s wedding to Meghan Markle, in May 2018, his hair thinning seemed to worsen, and it has shown no signs of slowing down.

Male Pattern Baldness can be exacerbated by stress, speeding up the rate of shedding in existing cases. Where there is a underlying genetic predisposition to androgenetic alopecia, it is possible for stress to trigger its premature onset, with or without a preceding bout of Telogen Effluvium – a common temporary hair loss condition often brought on by stress.

Prince Harry Sussex Royal October 2019
The Duke of Sussex meeting the President of Angola, João Lourenço, just days after the photo used on the Us Weekly was taken

A key factor likely to have suddenly accelerated his rate of hair fall is stress. In the past 18 months, the Duke has got married, moved house and become a father for the first time, as well as undertaking his various Royal obligations and charity work.

Wedding planning is a hugely stressful event for many people, let alone those whose marriage is being live-streamed to the world, as is moving house and becoming a father, so these are understandable and relatable potential causes of stress.

Obviously they may not have the money worries of the average person, they do have to contend with other pressures, such as press intrusion. This is a particular strain on the Duke whose mother, Princess Diana, was killed during a car chase with paparazzi in Paris.

During this same time period, Harry’s relationship and his wife have come under intense scrutiny from the media, receiving constant negative reports and criticisms, particularly from some sections of the UK press.

This has led to the Duke and Duchess of Sussex taking legal action against the owners of newspapers including the Daily Mail, Mirror and The Sun. This unusual step is the result of what Prince Harry described in a public statement as “bullying“:

“Unfortunately, my wife has become one of the latest victims of a British tabloid press that wages campaigns against individuals with no thought to the consequences – a ruthless campaign that has escalated over the past year, throughout her pregnancy and while raising our newborn son.

There is a human cost to this relentless propaganda, specifically when it is knowingly false and malicious, and though we have continued to put on a brave face – as so many of you can relate to – I cannot begin to describe how painful it has been…

…For these select media this is a game, and one that we have been unwilling to play from the start. I have been a silent witness to her private suffering for too long. To stand back and do nothing would be contrary to everything we believe in…

…Though this action may not be the safe one, it is the right one. Because my deepest fear is history repeating itself. I’ve seen what happens when someone I love is commoditised to the point that they are no longer treated or seen as a real person. I lost my mother and now I watch my wife falling victim to the same powerful forces.”

Dealing with stress-related hair loss

When going through periods of intense stress, this can impact the hair growth cycle, temporarily preventing it from functioning normally; this, in turn, can result in sudden bald spots from Alopecia Areata developing, or severe shedding.

Although some hair loss conditions caused by stress are temporary and normal hair growth should resume naturally in due course, others – including instances where Male Pattern Baldness is worsened – may require treatment.

The first step to dealing with stress-related hair loss is to identify the source of the problem and address it; lifestyle changes to help you better manage your stress – including having a balanced lifestyle with decent amounts of exercise, regular sleep, and a healthy diet – may also be beneficial.

Secondly, where the hairloss is a concern, a consultation with a specialist can provide you with a professional diagnosis and personalised recommendations for effective hair loss treatment solutions and hair growth supporting products.


Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinic Hair Loss Specialist Free ConsultationThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

Related Stories


As the evenings start getting darker again, the lack of daylight can leave people feeling tired and more sluggish than normal. However, in some cases, constant fatigue can be a sign of something more significant than the changing of the seasons.

There are a number of medical conditions which involve symptoms of constant tiredness and lethargy, many of which can also lead to hair loss.

Here we explore six of these health issues…

tiredness tired sleep ill health stress

1 Iron-Deficiency Anaemia

Essentially an iron-deficiency which can reduce the amount of oxygen supplied to tissues and organs, anaemia is easily detected via a blood test.

The NHS advises that symptoms of iron-deficiency anaemia can include tiredness and a lack of energy, shortness of breath, heart palpitations and pale skin.

It can affect both men and women and is commonly found in women, particularly during pregnancy or heavy periods.

Treatment involves adding extra iron to the diet, often via a course of high strength prescription supplements, to replace that which is missing and bring your levels back in line.

The type of hairloss this condition can cause is known as Telogen Effluvium; it involves shedding from all over the scalp, with diffuse hair fall affecting around 30 per cent of the head at once. Typically hair regrowth will resume naturally once the underlying cause has been dealt with – in this case, the iron deficiency.

It can last up to six months, though Telogen Effluvium treatment may help to accelerate this process. Should the affected individual also have active genetic hair loss, or the relevant dormant predisposition to Male Pattern Baldness or Female Pattern Hair Loss, these can be exacerbated or prematurely triggered.

2 Pernicious Anaemia

Pernicious anaemia follows much the same pattern and advice as for iron-deficiency anaemia, however, instead of a lack of iron, it relates to a deficiency in vitamin B12 and/or vitamin B9 (folate).

Symptoms include extreme tiredness, pins and needles, a sore and red tongue, mouth ulcers, muscle weakness, disturbed vision, depression and confusion, and memory problems.

This is mostly seen in people who are unable to properly absorb these nutrients – such as those with autoimmune disorders including Alopecia Areata – and, therefore, may unknowingly require higher doses. It is also a potential concern for those with a poor diet and is mostly found in those aged 75 or over.

Again, the hair loss condition that can be triggered during pernicious anaemia is Telogen Effluvium.

Normal Hair Growth Cycle and disrupted Alopecia Areata telogen effluvium diagram

3 Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism, also known as an underactive thyroid, can lead to tiredness, weight gain, dry hair and skin, muscle aches, cold sensitivity and feelings of depression.

It is diagnosed via a thyroid function test; this involves having a blood test to measure hormone levels. Although it can affect both men and women it is more common in women and it is possible for children to be born with the condition.

Treatment involves taking levothyroxine, a hormone replacement tablet taken daily to increase thyroxine levels. Hair loss, again in the form of Telogen Effluvium or Chronic Telogen Effluvium, also known as Diffuse Thinning, is a known side effect of this medication.

4 Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is where the thyroid is overactive; this can cause nervousness and anxiety, irritability, mood swings, difficulty sleeping, persistent tiredness, swelling in the neck, heart palpitations, itchiness, a sensitivity to heat, thinning hair and weight loss.

According to the NHS, an overactive thyroid is ten times more likely to affect women than men, and is often diagnosed when people are aged 20 to 40 years old.

In addition to hair thinning from Telogen Effluvium or Diffuse Thinning triggered by the underlying illness, treatment for hyperthyroidism may also cause temporary hair loss. An endocrinologist may recommend medication such as carbimazole, propylthouracil or beta blockers, all of which list thinning hair as a potential side effect.

Once the body has adjusted to the medication this shedding should stop and normal hair growth should resume, but if the hairloss persists for longer than a few weeks, professional advice should be sought.

5 Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition that can cause a person’s blood sugar levels to become too high and, whether type 1 or type 2, it has known links to hair loss.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder and, therefore, as people with any existing autoimmune diseases are more prone to developing others, those people with hair loss from Alopecia Areata, Alopecia Totalis or Alopecia Universalis are more likely to develop this insulin-related condition. Conversely, those with type 1 diabetes have a higher chance of developing forms of Alopecia Areata.

The mildest form of Alopecia Areata involves patchy hair loss of the scalp only; this may be temporary – lasting up to 12 months at a time – or may come and go over the years. Alopecia Areata treatment can be helpful for this phenotype, however, for the more severe forms which cause baldness of the head, or from head to toe, a dermatologist’s advice should be taken given treatments for these tend to be hospital-based.

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes – the more common of the two – are also linked to Telogen Effluvium and Diffuse Thinning. This is because the underlying chronic illness places a strain on the body which then diverts its resources towards maintaining critical functions. This can leave non-vital functions temporarily under-resourced.

In the case of hair growth, this can result in diffuse hair loss until the body is over this stress – usually once the health condition is being properly managed. It is possible for people with diabetes to use hair loss treatment and anyone concerned about on-going shedding may wish to consult a dedicated specialist about their options.

feet sleep

6 Restless Legs Syndrome

Willis-Ekbom disease, more commonly known as restless legs syndrome, is a common issue related to the nervous system. As the name suggests, the main symptom is a constant urge to move the legs, often worsening at night.

It causes a ‘crawling’ sensation from the feet to the thighs and can also involve involuntary jerking of the limbs, including arms, with women being twice as likely to have restless legs syndrome than men.

Thought to be related to how the body processes the chemical dopamine, restless legs syndrome is also thought to have genetic qualities and may be hereditary. It can also present as an additional symptom to iron-deficiency anaemia, pregnancy and kidney failure.

In mild cases it may only present occasionally, whilst for those where it is more severe it may happen daily. When it is so frequent it can have negative consequences for a person’s all-round well-being, largely due to the anxiety and lack of sleep – sometimes leading to insomnia – that it engenders.

This can lead to stress-related hair loss, most likely due to Chronic Telogen Effluvium, as well as dry, thinning hair given healthy hair growth requires good sleep hygiene. However, once the underlying reason for this condition developing has been diagnosed and dealt with, the hair should return to normal.

Frequent lack of sleep is essentially a form of stress, so needs to be properly managed.

Getting enough sleep on a regular basis is important for healthy hair growth, as well as for our overall well-being. Therefore, if you are feeling tired all the time and there’s no immediately obvious cause – looking after small children, noisy neighbours or late-night Netflix binges, for example – it is certainly worthwhile speaking to your GP about your concerns.


Circ - Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinics LondonThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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Trendy as it may be, substantial scientific proof that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) scalp injections work to restore hair loss is still thin on the ground.

Some studies say the procedure, which involves taking blood from the patient, spinning it in a centrifuge to separate it and injecting the most platelet-dense part of the mixture back into their scalp, works for androgenetic alopecia (AGA, also known as Male Pattern Baldness and Female Pattern Hair Loss) only as an adjunctive therapy when used alongside clinically-proven pharmaceutical hair loss treatments.

syringe-injection-prp-adipose

Others state that PRP may work for some people with thinning hair, but not others.

One thing most clinical trials investigating PRP do have in common is that they are small in size.

The latest study, from a Dermatology clinic team at the Seydisehir State Hospital in Turkey, which was published on 18th September 2019 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, is no exception.

With a total of 25 male participants, this too showed how PRP may work for some men but their level of hair loss when they first start treatment may determine the outcome, with those whose thinning is mild to moderate seeing better results than those with more advanced hairloss.

More studies into treatment performance factors needed

The Turkish research team stated an aim to “compare the efficacy and safety of physically activated PRP injections vs placebo in the treatment of male AGA“.

Their methodology involved conducting a randomized, placebo‐controlled, crossover study using treatments that administered either real PRP or a placebo. Hair density measurements were then assessed by taking the average of two independent blind measurements, and this score was used to determine the treatment’s efficacy.

They wrote of their findings, “In the group that received placebo first (Group 2), we detected a significant increase in hair density at the secondary endpoints after PRP treatment (P = .014). There was a greater proportion of patients with low‐grade alopecia in this group (53.3%) compared to Group 1 (30%).

This study provides data supporting the positive effects of PRP treatment on AGA in males, but further studies are needed to identify those factors that might affect PRP treatment performance, such as the stage of the disease.”

Alternative hair growth therapies

The effects of PRP for hairloss – and their value in terms of the expense of on-going sessions versus their hair regrowth performance – remain something of a grey area. Therefore, it is not something we offer here at Belgravia.

HairMax LaserBand 41 hair growth LLLT device buy from The Belgravia Centre hair loss clinic London
One of the HairMax LaserBand wearable, FDA-cleared LLLT devices

One PRP alternative we do recommend to patients is low level laser therapy (LLLT), delivered via a home-use, FDA-cleared device, such as the HairMax LaserBand.

This ergonomic headband has medical-grade lasers and patented teeth embedded in its flexible frame to part the hair and allow the LLLT to be delivered straight to the scalp. This uses photobiostimulation technology which the company says stimulate the hair follicles into stronger, increased hair density and revitalised hair as well as helping to prevent hair loss.

Its manufacturers also claim that, with proper use – three sessions per week for between 90 seconds and 3 minutes each time depending on the model – the LaserBand has a 93 per cent success rate, based on clinical trial results.

Ideally this should be used as a hair growth supporting product to be used alongside clinically-proven hair loss treatments, though it can be used on its own.

For those unsure as to the best way to deal with losing their hair, or which may be the best hair loss solution for them, we recommend researching reputable hair loss clinics and having consultations. This will arm you with a professional diagnosis, personalised treatment recommendations and advice on additional ways to promote healthy hair growth, as well as answering any questions you may have.


Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinic Hair Loss Specialist Free ConsultationThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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Although many people seem to – mistakenly – believe that hats can cause hair loss, in future they may actually be linked to hair growth.

Following on from wearable low level laser therapy (LLLT) devices set inside caps or helmets, researchers in the USA and China have produced a next generation hair loss solution which can also be discretely placed inside a hat.

Rather than being light-focused, however, this new technology involves the use of a wireless patch which administers electric pulses to stimulate hair follicles into regrowing hair. It is currently aimed at treating Male Pattern Baldness and Female Pattern Hair Loss.

Reports of this clinical trial, which was conducted on rats and mice, were published in the American Chemical Society journal on 10th September 2019. The paper is entitled Self-Activated Electrical Stimulation for Effective Hair Regeneration via a Wearable Omnidirectional Pulse Generator.

Stimulate faster hair regrowth

A team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed a flexible, 1 millimetre-thick patch, made of various layered materials which are charged by the wearer’s body movement-generated energy. These layers then produce electricity when they make contact with each other, creating pulses which then sparked hair regrowth in both shaved rats and mice with a form of genetic hairloss, during the trial.

The hair growth stimulated by this process, is known as the triboelectric effect; it is thought to encourage the natural production of chemicals including keratinocyte and vascular endothelial growth factors, which contribute to normal healthy hair growth.

According to the study, hair regrowth was notably faster in the group of mice treated this way than it was in a comparator group where shaved rats were treated with topical minoxidil lotion and inert saline solutions.

High strength minoxidil is currently the only unisex genetic hair loss treatment to be both MHRA-licensed and FDA-approved. It is a dose-dependent drug which is applied directly to the scalp either once or twice per day, depending on the formulation, and is considered to have a low side effect profile.

Whilst other electric pulse devices have been shown to stimulate hair growth previously, they have always involved being hooked up to a battery pack or electricity source; this novel device aims to be more convenient and ergonomic by being wirelessly housed in a specially-designed baseball cap.

The patch was also tested on hairless mice which were genetically deficient in hair growth factors, over a nine-day period. The patch was applied to each mouse and the area surrounding the patch was treated with minoxidil and saline solution.

At the end of this trial, those mice being treated with the patch saw their fur grow to 2 millimetres in length where the patch was placed, and 1 millimetre-long in the other areas that were treated topically. The researchers further noted that hair density measurements were three times greater where the patch was applied when compared to the minoxidil-saline areas.

To be tested on Male Pattern Hair Loss patients

Research paper author, Xudong Wang of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, revealed he had also tried the patch on his father who had been losing his hair for a number of years.

“It helped him to grow a lot of new hairs after one month,” says Wang, noting that this gentle electric pulse therapy would not be suitable for people who had already been bald for a number of years – only those who were experiencing mild to advanced thinning hair or who had recently gone bald.

It would need to be worn for “a few hours” each day during which the wearer would need to be somewhat active in terms of head movement in order for the necessary amount of electricity to be generated.

As a result of these developments, and a wearable prototype of the baseball cap version having been produced, the team is now seeking approval for human clinical trials featuring men with androgenetic alopecia. This is because Wang believes Male Pattern Baldness to be the closest hair loss condition to the mouse model they have already tested.

Although Belgravia is not involved in these trials, we will post news regarding their progress here our our hair loss blog as updates become available.

Whilst an interesting development, it may be a number of years before such trials are completed and the relevant safety and efficacy criteria required for FDA clearance are reached.

In the meantime, those interested in augmenting their hair loss treatment course with addition hair growth supporting products can choose from a number of authorised LLLT devices, including the HairMax LaserBand range.

These flexible, wireless headbands use medical-grade lasers and patented teeth designs to part the hair and get straight to the scalp, helping to stimulate hair growth and hair strength. The manufacturers claim these devices – which are used for 90 seconds, 3 time per week (82 model) or 3 minutes, 3 times per week (41 model) – have a 93 per cent success rate.


The Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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Former England bowler, Ryan Sidebottom was the David Luiz of cricket – that is to say he was as well known for his mop of unruly curls as he was for his sporting prowess.

Following his retirement from professional sport in 2017, the Yorkshireman went on to pursue a career in TV, appearing on the reality show Dancing on Ice in 2019.

It was during filming for this primetime programme that he realised he was experiencing a receding hairline and decided to do something about it to preserve the signature big-haired look that earned him the nickname ‘Stringfellow’.

Hair transplant to preserve image

“My hair is my image, it’s part of my personality, it’s what I’m known for in a way,” Sidebottom told The Sun, explaining why he decided to take a two-pronged approach to tackling his Male Pattern Baldness.

Ryan Sidebottom Cricketer

The 41 year old advised he wanted to find an effective way of preventing baldness as he believes, in such an image-conscious society, it was important for both his future work prospects as a TV personality, and his self-confidence.

As such, in addition to following a hair loss treatment course comprising the MHRA-licensed and FDA-approved DHT-blocker, finasteride 1mg, he also chose to have a hair transplant to fill in the receding areas above his temples.

Sidebottom opted for a Follicular Unit Extraction – or ‘Excision‘ – procedure, often referred to as simply FUE. This involved having 2,450 individual hairs harvested from the donor area of the scalp – the back and sides of the head which are not affected by genetic hair loss – and grafted into the thinning frontal areas.

The pharmaceutical male hair loss treatment he is using – to which a clinically-proven topical medication, high strength minoxidil, could also be added – acts as on-going aftercare.

Whilst the newly implanted hairs will be immune to the effects of DHT, those in the areas with susceptible follicles – namely along the vertex, from hairline to crown – remain open to the process of follicular miniaturisation. If hair loss prevention remedies are not used, the hair in these areas may thin and shed around the transplanted areas, leading to unnatural-looking patchy hair loss.

In addition to the medication Ryan Sidebottom is taking to help prevent hairloss, he also undergoes low level laser therapy (LLLT) sessions once a fortnight. Although it can be performed in hair loss clinics, Belgravia advises suitable patients that FDA-cleared, home-use LLLT devices, such as the LaserBand may be more convenient, especially for those with a busy schedule.

The medical-grade lasers they contain work alongside patented teeth to administer LLLT straight to the scalp where it stimulates follicles into producing strong hair and deterring thinning hair. It is generally used for a few minutes each week.

Confidence-boost

After his operation Ryan Sidebottom told The Sun, “I was losing my hair at the front. I noticed it a little bit on Dancing On Ice in hair and makeup. When you see yourself on TV or in any newspaper, if you see that and don’t think it looks good, it’s a confidence thing.

It would have changed my outlook. It would have changed my personality and probably I would have become more introverted on the back of it… The hair makes all the difference. It was really important for me to keep my hairstyle and have the surgery.”

While some people still consider hair loss to be a cosmetic issue, the emotional and mental health implications it can cause or exacerbate should not be undermined.

Concern over the effects hair loss may have on their careers is a sentiment often cited by the few celebrities who have chosen to be open about having hair transplant surgery.

Actor James Nesbitt OBE, has been particularly vocal on the subject and attributes at least part of his on-going success to his two hair restoration surgeries – both in terms of aesthetics and the confidence a full head of hair gives him.

It is not just something that effects celebrities, however. Many men deal with thinning hair as they feel the pressure to look youthful in the workplace or decide a bald head would not present the right image for them.

Deciding what to do when starting to go bald is an extremely personal decision and, for those affected, it is important to have all the facts about possible options beforehand so as to make an informed choice they feel comfortable about and confident in.


Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinic Hair Loss Specialist Free ConsultationThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.

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