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The kind of hair loss known as Scarring Alopecia is often permanent, with hair follicles destroyed by the condition Cicatricial Alopecia.

This is certainly true in cases of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA), which is believed to be linked to or synonymous with a condition named Follicular Degeneration Syndrome, itself also known as Hot Comb Alopecia – though this is something of a misnomer.

CCCA is a condition that most commonly affects black women with afro hair, and doctors in the US have launched a study to try and find out more about how these women are affected by it and how easily they are able to get treatment.

Hair Loss Research StudyEarlier detection may lead to better treatment

Researchers at Northwestern University in Illinois believe that earlier detection of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia will lead to better treatment and less psychological stress placed upon those who are diagnosed. To explore this, they are recruiting 50 women with the condition to try and ascertain exactly what personal, historical, logistical and environmental factors got in the way of obtaining medical care for their condition.

The doctors will also be asking women with the condition how it has affected their life. They write: “Based on previous research on the psychosocial impact of generalised hair loss in black women, it is fair to consider that CCCA hair loss also leads to problems with self-esteem and participation in daily life activities. This research, the first of its kind, will add to existing knowledge of CCCA by investigating the quality of life and barriers to care of patients with this condition.”

The team’s findings will, they say, be instrumental in modifying dermatology resident training, adding to existing dermatology management guidelines, and even developing public health advocacy programming. The Illinois study is scheduled to finish this summer, although it seems unlikely that the findings will have any bearing on treatment options outside of the US.

Stress, diet and genetics?

Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia is not an especially rare condition, accounting for about three per cent of all hair loss diagnoses, but it is not all that well understood, with causes thought to include stress, poor diet and possibly even genetics. It was once thought to have been caused uniquely by extremely high temperatures of the hot oil applied during traditional straightening treatments (hence “Hot Comb” Alopecia) but this is no longer the case.

What the Illinois doctors have correctly identified is that the chances of someone with the condition making a recovery are greatly improved following early detection.

Whilst most forms of Scarring Alopecia cannot be treated due to the follicles having died, FDS is an exception. With Follicular Degeneration Syndrome treatment the goal is to catch ailing follicles while they are still alive, before scarring sets in. If follicles do indeed still show signs of life, a personalised treatment course devised by a specialist hair loss clinic can often stimulate them back into growth.

The key treatment that these courses are built around is often a recommended formulation of high strength minoxidil. This is applied topically to the scalp once or twice per day, as directed by your treatment advisor, and can also be combined with hair growth boosters to further aid recovery. FDS is often seen alongside another hair loss condition: Traction Alopecia and courses can be customised to address both issues simultaneously.

When pharmaceutical treatment is no longer possible because follicles have died, a hair transplant may sometimes be possible. This is decided solely on a case by case basis and it is imperative that there is enough donor hair elsewhere on the head to work with. As with all hair loss conditions, early detection and a professional diagnosis equate to the best possible chances of regrowth.


Circ - Minoxidil iconThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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More evidence has been found that key minerals may play a part in Alopecia Areata, the autoimmune disorder that leads to sudden, patchy hair loss.

Analysing data from 10 previous studies – in which 764 people had taken part – researchers at the Yuhuangding Hospital in Yantai, China, found that levels of both zinc and selenium were lower in people with Alopecia Areata.

The levels had been ascertained by an analysis of patients’ serum – a component of blood – which also found there to be no aberration in levels of copper, iron, ferritin or magnesium. The Chinese team drew no concrete conclusions from their findings, but suggested that a deficiency of zinc and selenium may be associated with the susceptibility of Alopecia Areata. They are now recommending targeted studies to see if cases of Alopecia Areata may be improved by “correcting” zinc and selenium levels.

Zinc Vitamin SupplementsZinc’s role in Alopecia Areata

The part that a zinc deficiency may play in Alopecia Areata has certainly been highlighted before: in 2015 researchers at the Ain Shams University in Cairo discovered that people with the condition could see an increase in the severity of their baldness if they had low levels of serum zinc.

These findings weren’t exactly a shock to medical professionals as zinc is known to play a key role in hair production. All hair follicles need a supply of zinc to produce new hair shafts during the anagen (growth) phase of the hair growth cycle, and shedding is sometimes observed when levels of zinc are low.

However, low levels of zinc do not normally equate to the immediate onset of Alopecia Areata. More commonly, they can trigger a temporary hair loss condition called Telogen Effluvium, as can various other imbalances in a person’s diet. As with Alopecia Areata treatment, specialist intervention from a trained professional can provide beneficial results for people with Telogen Effluvium, although many cases will clear up on their own in up to six months.

Zinc’s potential role in Alopecia Areata, however, is only recently starting to come to the fore. Might it be that the mineral could stave off cases of Alopecia Areata, or reduce the severity of each case?

Unfortunately, there’s a catch. As with many things related to hair, a delicate balancing act is at play when it comes to what we put into our bodies. And both selenium and zinc have been listed by experts as being likely to actually cause hair loss when they are taken in too great a quantity.

America’s National Institutes of Health are among those who have said that too much selenium can lead to thinning hair, while the Nutritional Supplements Health Guide says that an excess of zinc can lead to hairloss, too.

Links between vitamins and hair loss

Doctors are regularly finding links between thinning hair and an excess of/deficiency of vitamins and minerals. Recently a lack of vitamin D has been linked with Alopecia Areata, as well as with the genetic condition Female Pattern Hair Loss, too.

Ensuring that your body has the recommended daily intake of everything it needs is certainly a sensible idea, but this is perhaps not the best way to tackle a hair loss condition. What makes more sense is a visit to a specialist hair loss clinic for a diagnosis. Following a conversation with a trained expert that takes into account everything from your lifestyle to your diet, an explanation of and recommendations for a personalised course of the most appropriate products, from clinically-proven hair loss treatments to hair growth boosters, including Belgravia’s food supplements, Hair Vitalics.


The Belgravia CentreThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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People with the autoimmune disorder Alopecia Areata, which is commonly associated with sudden, patchy hair loss, are being offered a free psychological self-help intervention to see if can boost their confidence.

Researchers at Sheffield University’s Department of Psychology are currently recruiting people who are aged 18 and over and identify themselves as having a visible skin difference (including Alopecia Areata) and a fear of negative valuation from others.

Research - Online hair loss research website self helpConfidence dented

People with Alopecia Areata frequently find that their thinning hair leads to a dent in their confidence, and common issues include the feeling that strangers can’t stop looking at them (often wondering if they have cancer) and that their whole identity has been changed. Participants in the Sheffield trial will be emailed a PDF that is designed to help build confidence in social situations.

In an online appeal asking for people to take part, the researchers state that: “Your responses will be used to see whether the intervention was helpful. The results will be written up as part of the lead researcher’s thesis for the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Sheffield and we will seek to disseminate the findings through publication in academic journals.”

This request follows a similar one from the University of Oxford which has also been looking for young people to talk candidly about their experiences of autoimmune hair loss as part of an advisory project. The feedback is used on self-help websites called healthtalk.org and youthhealthtalk.org in order to give readers the chance to find out more about what it’s like to experience Alopecia Areata from people who have gone through it, or are still affected by it now.

Effective treatment

At Belgravia Alopecia Areata treatment for the scalp-only patchy hair loss mild version begins with a full diagnosis and a conversation about the client’s lifestyle, as the condition has multiple suspected ‘triggers’ which it would naturally be beneficial to eliminate or reduce when possible.

Minoxidil DropperThese include psychological long-term chronic stress, shock and sudden extreme stress, physical trauma, hormones and allergies. Following this a fully rounded treatment course based around high strength minoxidil from the recommended formulations available at Belgravia’s in-clinic pharmacies, is prescribed.

While treatment can be very effective when Alopecia Areata is not too severe, more extreme forms of the condition are notoriously difficult to treat, with sister conditions Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis rarely responding to current hospital-based treatment options.

Because of this, and thanks in part to some major “accidental” breakthroughs which show certain JAK inhibitor drugs to be effective at growing hair, new trials are taking place at several centres around the world that could open up new treatment options for those with more extreme forms of the condition.

Unfortunately, these drugs were originally developed to treat certain cancers and as they are somewhat powerful, the side effects that come with some of them leave a question mark over whether or not they will be approved for use on people with Alopecia Areata.


Belgravia CentreThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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HairlossANSWERS - Click to Submit Your Query to Our Hair Loss Experts

Name: Chez

Question: Hi. I am a 23 year old man. I used hair wax (BED HEAD For Men by TIGI) in July last year. I was advised by friends to wash it before I sleep. I used it only twice. Once, I washed it before sleeping, and the other time, I delayed washing to four days. Then when I washed my hair I lost hair excessively. It shocked me to see so much hair-loss in my shower. After that, I kept losing hair for the next few months. I thought shaving my head would solve it – I did that twice. But to no avail. The hair loss ceased at one point. Untill this point, I had only been losing hair in an oval pattern on the front and like an army cut on my lower sides. Now the hair loss has returned. I’m losing hair now on the top mainly. What can be the reasons? Is this MPB or caused by the hair wax (in which case is it treatable?) Should I visit a doctor? Thank you.

Answer: Hi, Chez. It is a common misconception, but it is highly unlikely that your hair styling product is related to your hair loss.

From what you are describing here, the hair loss in an oval pattern sounds like alopecia areata, whilst the thinning on top is almost certainly male pattern baldness.

Alopecia Areata is an autoimmune disorder which causes rounded bald patches – either one or many – which can appear suddenly, anywhere on the scalp. There is alopecia areata treatment available to deal with this type of patchy hair loss but it is often temporary. How long the bout will last and whether or not it will recur is unknown – as is the precise cause of this enigmatic condition, though triggers are known to include shock, trauma or extreme stress. So, if you think back to what happened around the time you noticed your first bald spot, you may be able to identify what brought this on.

Male Pattern Baldness only affects the top of the scalp and the hairline. Unlike Alopecia Areata, it does not affect the sides or back of the head and also causes gradual hair thinning rather than sudden bald patches. It is a genetic hair loss condition which you inherit from your parents and, in those who are so predisposed, can be accelerated by certain lifestyle factors including stress. The onset can occur any time following puberty so, although 23 is young for this type of hairloss to start, it certainly not uncommon.

In order to ascertain exactly what is going on with your hair, assuming you are otherwise in good health, we recommend you have a consultation with a hair loss specialist. They will be able to assess you and provide a professional diagnosis of your condition – or conditions, as it is possible to experience more than one simultaneously. Additionally, they will be able to tailor a bespoke hair loss treatment programme to suit your specific needs and recommend the most effective course of action.


The Belgravia Centre Hair Loss ClinicThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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It’s a case of New Year, new look for Belgravia’s charitable Accounts Assistant, Kathleen, who has had a dramatic haircut in order to help children with hair loss.

Inspired by our reception manager, Roxy, who donated 12 inches of her long hair in December 2016, Kathleen easily equaled her donation. This makes a total of at least 24 inches between them!

Drastic change

Compassionate Kathleen was nervous about having so much of her beautiful hair cut off, and is still getting used to her chic, choppy bob. She said of getting the chop: “It’s definitely a drastic change and it is slowly growing on me. I’m starting to like it more each day though. It’s funny as I initially said I was going to donate 7-8 inches… turns out the hairdresser took 12-13 inches off, but it is for a good cause so I can deal with it.” Continues below

Kathleen Belgravia Centre Little Princess Trust Hair Loss Charity Donation

We think she looks fabulous with her shorter hairstyle and are so proud of our kindhearted staff members, who are both based at The Belgravia Centre flagship hair loss clinic opposite Victoria Station.

The two women donated their hair to the Little Princess Trust charity which supplies real hair wigs to children who need them. This is usually due to hair loss from cancer treatment or from severe forms of the autoimmune disorder Alopecia Areata. Receiving one of these wigs can help children’s self-esteem, which can suffer tremendous strain under such circumstances, and help them to feel as if they ‘fit in’.

Wigs for girls and boys

Established in 2006, the charity is a recipient of The Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service – ‘the MBE for volunteer groups’ its website clarifies.

During its centenary year the Little Princess Trust’s work got a publicity boost when former One Direction pop star Harry Styles grew out then donated his hair to them. This led to an increase in people donating their hair and also to those raising money for the charity. It is so important to keep the momentum going as this financial support helps Little Princess Trust – which also encompasses a boys’ division called Hair 4 Boys – to continue to supply its wigs, usually made from the donated hair though afro hair wigs have to be manufactured separately, free of charge.

In addition to its wig service, the charity also recently announced that it had raised £500,000 to be put towards research into childhood cancers.


The Belgravia CentreThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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Gotham star Anthony Carrigan has once again proved himself to be a champion of living life to the full in spite of having hair loss.

The TV star talked about his condition – Alopecia Areata – in a video for the online channel The Great Big Story, a rather magical destination for anyone in search of positive, uplifting stories. The film follows on the heels of another video the actor made in which he opens up about the baldness which has played such a significant part in both his life and his career.

Anthony Carrigan With Hair Alopecia Areata Bald SpotsSudden, patchy hair loss

Alopecia Areata is not a hair loss condition as such; it is categorised as an autoimmune disorder which commonly leads to patchy hair loss of the scalp. This usually happens rapidly and without warning, and while it may clear up in a few months in some instances, in others it will linger, spread and possibly recur. There are also related conditions – often still referred to in discussion as ‘Alopecia Areata’ though their names are actually Alopecia Totalis, which causes total baldness of the head, often including loss of facial hair including eyelashes and eyebrows, and Alopecia Universalis, which leads to complete baldness from head to toe.

As Carrigan explains in his Great Big Story video – which has already been viewed more than 500,000 times on Facebook – Alopecia Areata happens when the body mistakenly believes it is being attacked, with the result that hair follicles prematurely enter the telogen (resting) phase, resulting in rapid hair fall.

Says Carrigan: “When I was 26 I started losing a lot of hair. It was terrifying, but I wouldn’t change a thing about how everything has unfolded.

The actor goes on to explain that he was very shy as a child, and that when he first started acting he started to discover a “voice” within himself. “When I lost a lot hair, I had no idea what to do,” he says. “I didn’t know if I could remain in this business that was so image-focused. But then I found something within me that was worth fighting for.”

He says he found a whole new perspective on the way that he looked and what kind of characters he could play – and he began to cultivate that. “I have been typecast as the villain,” he admits. “I think it isn’t just me; bald guys throughout history have played the villain.” Continues below

The comments accompanying the Facebook post suggest that Carrigan’s short video has been well-received by the many people with Alopecia Areata who have seen it. One, a 28-year-old woman named Ashley Newbert, writes: “I love my alopecia. I embrace my beauty but it’s so hard at times – but my friends and family always say: ‘Ash, that’s you! We love you like that and wouldn’t know you otherwise.’ I’ve never worn a wig and I refuse to, my choice. I love it.”

Effective treatment

Alopecia Areata treatment can be very effective when the condition is not too severe; Carrigan’s smooth head and lack of eyebrows suggests that his hair loss is pronounced however he does actually shave his head to get the fully bald look. Some people with the condition – which can affect up to two per cent of all people in their lifetime – prefer the completely-bald look to the patchy appearance that is typical of this disorder.

Two of Alopecia Areata’s related conditions, however, do lead to total hair loss on the head: the aforementioned Alopecia Totalis and Universalis, the latter condition also leading to total hair loss on the body, too.

Carrigan does seem genuinely accepting of his situation, and is undoubtedly a positive role model for others with Alopecia Areata. He says: “For the longest time I tried to create a certain ‘self’ that didn’t have Alopecia Areata, because a lot of time we feel like we need to put on a face. But that’s just not real. It’s all about being human and it being OK to not be perfect.”


Circ - The Belgravia Centre Treatment for Hair LossThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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People with the autoimmune disorder Alopecia Areata will be no strangers to sudden patchy hair loss, and they will also most likely have been told that inflammation is thought to be the real culprit behind their shedding.

Inflammation can be interpreted as the body’s natural response to infection and foreign organisms; it is also the body’s way of trying to heal itself after an injury (think of a stubbed toe that quickly swells). But when associated with autoimmune disorders it actually signals that something has gone wrong. In effect, the body has started attacking itself.

Plug On Switch Off SocketTurn off unwanted responses

Doctors in the US have been investigating ways to try and stop the body from producing such unwanted inflammatory responses, which are an underlying symptom involved in autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis and Chrohn’s disease.

Their research, which was published in the Nature Journal, has led them to the invention of what has been described as a kind of pacemaker – a tiny electronic device that aims to switch off inflammation when it is not helpful.

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have been focusing on the vagus nerve, which is part of the parasympathetic nervous system and connects the brain with the gut, liver, heart pancreas and multiple other vital organs. Simply finding a way to switch it off, however, was not an option, as it needs to function for people to survive. Their goal was to be able to keep the good stuff (normal function), and filter out the bad (unwanted inflammation).

They found their solution – which has been tested in rats – by devising a way to stimulate the vagus nerve while simultaneously inhibiting unwanted nerve activity in a targeted manner. While it is early days yet, this kind of thinking may one day help people with Alopecia Areata to filter out the neural activity that leads to inflammation. Whilst the condition is often thought of as a hair loss condition, it is in fact another autoimmune disorder.

We use an electrode with a kilohertz frequency that blocks unwanted nerve conduction in addition to the electrode that stimulates nerve activity,” said principal investigator Robert Butera, a professor jointly appointed in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. “We’ve arranged the two near each other, so the blocking electrode forces the stimulation from the stimulating electrode to only go in one direction.”

Treatment for Alopecia

Alopecia Areata treatment can often be effective when the condition affects the scalp only, but more severe cases can be difficult to treat and extreme forms of the disease such as Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis have an especially bleak prognosis. As a result, the medical community is currently looking at multiple new ways to treat severe Alopecia Areata, including trialling a new suite of drugs that were originally designed to treat certain cancers, among other things, named JAK inhibitors. Indeed, JAK inhibitors’ anti-inflammatory properties are already being used to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

Inflammation has many causes, ranging from depression to diet; likewise, Alopecia Areata has a number of suspected triggers, ranging from physical trauma to severe emotional stress. Although in cases of autoimmune hair loss the resulting bald patches appear suddenly, there are also various temporary hair loss conditions that can also be sparked by these same events. These, however, present as all-over hair thinning and do not become noticeable for around three months.

If you are concerned about sudden hair fall, bald spots or thinning hair, taking the first step and getting a professional consultation and diagnosis can help to relieve some of the anxiety these issues can cause. It can also arm you with expert information on appropriate hair loss treatments and advice about how to manage your condition.


The Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Clinic - Hair Loss Specialist ConsultationThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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If there is a single silver lining to be found on the cloud that makes people go bald, it is that people with hair loss don’t have to suffer the indignity of goose bumps on their head when it’s cold.

It’s not much of a consolation but at least it’s something. And now scientists think they know a bit more about why bald scalps don’t get goose bumps.

Inducing GoosebumpsNot an evolutionary hangover

A research team at the University of Melbourne has been studying the mechanisms of goose bumps and made some surprising discoveries. They say that far from being a mere evolutionary hangover (a throwback to days when we needed hairy bodies to keep warm), goose bumps are closely linked to healing of the skin and cell regeneration.

Writing on the university’s website, the team explains that goose bumps are very small elevations in the skin that occur around the hair follicle. On the side wall of every follicle, under the surface of the skin, lies the arrector pili muscles, also known as ‘goose bump muscles’.

When hair emerges from the skin, it usually sits at an angle,” the study states. Then, when the goose bump muscle contracts, it “elevates the hair and pulls the angle of the follicle straighter so the hair literally stands on end.

This is what helps mammals stay warm – these hairs help create an air pocket that traps in warm air around the follicle. While this no longer plays an important part in the life of humans, the arrector pili certainly does.

The researchers explain that hair follicles have the unique ability to completely regenerate. “When a hair is plucked, up to 70 per cent of the follicle is destroyed, but when the hair regrows, the follicle regenerates itself,” they say.

Arrector Pili Goose Bump goosebump diagramThe Melbourne University team adds that the lower end of the goose bump muscle is joined to the follicle, so it creates what they call a ‘stem cell niche’: a place that guards and maintains stem cell populations. The upper end of the goose bump muscle creates a second stem cell niche, which is more important still because it maintains the stem cell population for the entire outer layer of the skin. The doctors explain that this muscle “is like a dumbbell connecting the two vital stem cell niches.”

This new knowledge helps scientists better understand where the epidermis’ stem cells really are – but how does it relate to baldness?

“We discovered that when you go bald, part of the problem is because the attachment of the goose bump muscle to the hair follicle is destroyed and replaced by fat,” says Professor Rodney Sinclair, who is head of Dermatology at the University. “You can’t get goose bumps on the scalp when you go bald and you can’t regrow hairs either because the follicles can’t regenerate.”

New lines of thinking

The hope now is that this newfound understanding of the skin’s relationship with the goosebump muscle may unlock new lines of thinking pertaining to hair loss, especially conditions which can cause baldness.

The most commonly seen of these is Male Pattern Baldness. This hereditary condition affects around half of all men by the time they hit 50, though it can affect men much younger as it can begin in those with an existing genetic predisposition any time following puberty.

Minoxidiil and Finasteride 1mg tablets - hair loss treatment SMALLThere are currently two clinically-proven male hair loss treatments and a range of additional hair growth boosters which can be used to help stabilise shedding and promote hair growth. This approach can be incredibly effective – Belgravia alone has seen thousands of regrowth success stories – although it does require the follicles to be active in order to be appropriate. Hair loss treatment will not work on bald scalps where the skin has taken on a shiny, smooth appearance as this indicates that the follicles are no longer active.

The arrector pili muscles have already popped up in research into the hair loss condition Traction Alopecia, too, however. This is often caused by frequently wearing hairstyles, such as braids or hair extensions, that place excessive strain on the hair follicles. It can lead to what looks like a receding hairline, as the hairline and temple area bears the brunt of this pressure, as well as patchy hairloss where the hairstyle is secured.

The founder of Applied Biology, Professor Andy Goren, had been researching new options for Traction Alopecia treatment, when he discovered how the goosebump muscle holding each hair had a tendency to grip onto it with more force when it was contracted. He then used this observation to help create a technique that would lead to less shedding during styling procedures, helping people to avoid developing this form of hairloss.


Belgravia CentreThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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A somewhat unorthodox trial into treatment options for Alopecia Areata, which leads to sudden, patchy hair loss, has been cancelled.

The trial had been trying to gather steam since 2011, when it was first announced by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York.

Dermaroller

A dermaroller, often used to administer dry needling therapy

Lack of willing participants

Researchers had hoped to show that irritating the scalp with hypodermic needles was just as effective a treatment for Alopecia Areata, which is an autoimmune disorder, as a hair transplant. Alarmingly, perhaps, they were seeking people who were prepared to have one of their bald spots treated with transplant surgery, and another pricked by a needle.

Unsurprisingly, not enough people signed up as participants and the trial has now been terminated.

Hair transplants are not commonly performed on people with Alopecia Areata as it is a condition that often comes and goes, and bald patches don’t always return in the same place. Hair transplants are more commonly associated with the genetic hair loss condition Male Pattern Baldness.

At Belgravia Alopecia Areata treatment can often produce significant results, when it involves bald patches on the scalp only, by using recommended formulations of high strength minoxidil. This is applied directly to the scalp and can be combined with hair-growth boosters. At the moment, however, the world could be on the cusp of a landmark period in terms of alopecia treatment, particularly for the more severe and currently untreatable conditions, with some very promising new drugs called JAK inhibitors currently being trialled as new treatment options.

Qi Xing Acupuncture Needle

A Qi Xing acupuncture needle

Extreme forms of Alopecia Areata

If approved and declared safe for general use on people with the condition, these will likely offer particular hope to people with extreme forms of Alopecia Areata, such as Alopecia Totalis and Alopecia Universalis, which leads to total hair loss on the whole head (both) and the head and whole body (AU only). Presently treatment for these two conditions has notably low success rates and, in addition, can be uncomfortable and inconvenient.

What would have been interesting had the New York trial taken place would have been to see how well the bald patches of people with Alopecia Areata responded to being irritated with hypodermic needles, a technique known as “dry needling”, both with and without the additional use of minoxidil.

This type of needle therapy is similar to microneedling – which has been investigated for its potential boosting benefits when used in combination with pharmaceutical hair loss treatment for male pattern baldness – and is also broadly similar to acupuncture.

Clearly, the doctors think that this approach has some merit and the abandoned trial may have been designed as a follow on to a 2016 study into treating alopecia areata with acupuncture. Researchers from the small scale Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine trial  found that acupuncture could regrow hair in cases of autoimmune hair loss, and that results were most encouraging when using a seven-star needle, known as the Qi Xing.


Circ - Minoxidil iconThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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A study into people with a commonly-seen form of eczema has found that the chances of them going on to develop Alopecia Areata, which leads to sudden, patchy hair loss, are “significantly increased” when compared to what would typically be expected.

The condition that was investigated is known as atopic dermatitis, which the NHS website says is the most common form of eczema. It causes the skin to become itchy, red, dry and cracked.

Doctors at the Warren Alpert Medical School in Providence, Rhode Island, found that 11 per cent of the people whose records they assessed had a history of atopic dermatitis (AD) in 2009. Over the next two years, 147 of these people went on to be seen by a doctor for Alopecia Areata as well.

Atopic Dermatitis skin condition

An example of atopic dermatitis

AD is a risk factor

The doctors in the American study say that AD should now be recorded as a risk factor for developing Alopecia Areata. “This study provides further evidence that these conditions are frequently comorbid,” they write, having found that AD is also often a marker for the skin-lightening condition vitiligo, too. Comorbid, incidentally, means medical conditions that occur at the same time.

Alopecia Areata is a vexing autoimmune disorder that has been in the news quite a lot of late, as it is perhaps only now that the condition is starting to become more fully understood. There are several ‘triggers’ for the condition, including psychological long-term stress, physical trauma, shock and sudden extreme stress, allergies and more.

What makes it so distressing for people with the condition is that the sudden bald patches caused by Alopecia Areata quite often clear up by themselves within six months or so after the initial hair loss… only to return at a later date, often on a different part of the head. It is also impossible to predict whether or not the hair will regrow, which can make it something of a waiting game. Whilst one-off instances are common, a diagnosis of Alopecia Areata can, therefore, also be the beginning of a life-long journey in which losing one’s hair is a recurrent feature.

Alopecia Areata treatment is available, however, and at Belgravia our approach, using topical solutions and hair growth boosters, has produced many success stories. Each treatment plan is customised to the individual client’s needs by their dedicated hair loss specialist who will provide advice and recommendations, as well as support throughout their course.

Two per cent affected

Around two per cent of all people will be affected by Alopecia Areata hair loss in their lifetime, meaning a potential market of many millions for those involved in the creation of treatments for the condition. One area of research that is showing real promise is that centred around a collection of drugs known as JAK inhibitors, which were originally developed to treat certain cancers, rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions.

It is likely to be some time, however, before any new products based around these drugs become available for people with Alopecia Areata, meaning that anyone presenting with the condition today would be ill-advised to sit back and wait for a miracle cure, especially as the condition can often, as stated, be treated at a specialist clinic.


Circ The Belgravia Centre Hair Loss Treatment for Alopecia AreataThe Belgravia Centre

The Belgravia Centre is the leader in hair loss treatment in the UK, with two clinics based in Central London. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the UK or the rest of the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which are the largest collection of such success stories in the world and demonstrate the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time for our hair loss helpline or to arrange a free consultation.


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